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I' using Sieve to calculate the sum of all prime number below 2 million, but the program keeps crashing after trying several times due to overflow. It works fine with PRIME_LIMIT = 200000

So what is the problem in my code? I don't think that's the algorithm problem. When I put static keyword when declaring the boolean array, it prints out the wrong sum ... without the keyword, it's overflow ...

This is the method I wrote:

void problem10()

    {
        unsigned long long int iter = 2, sum = 0;

        static bool prime[PRIME_LIMIT];

        for (unsigned long long int i = 0; i < PRIME_LIMIT; i++)
        {
            prime[i] = true;
        }

        unsigned long long int limit = ceil(sqrt(PRIME_LIMIT));

        for (unsigned long long int i = 2; i <= limit; i++)
        {
            if (prime[i])
            {
                for (unsigned long long int j = i*i; j < PRIME_LIMIT; j += i)
                {
                    prime[j] = false;
                }
            }
        }

        for (unsigned long long int i = 2; i < PRIME_LIMIT; i++)
        {
            if (prime[i])
            {
                sum += i;
                //printf("Primes are: %d\n", i);
            }
        }
            printf("Sum of prime is: %llu\n", sum);
    }
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3  
Without static, the bool prime[PRIME_LIMIT] array is probably too large to be allocated on the heap, this causes the crash. – With static, it should work and actually produces the correct result in my test. –  Martin R Apr 12 at 20:50
1  
The code works for me when I include enough headers (<math.h>, <stdbool.h>, <stdio.h>) and provide a main() that calls the function (and remove unused variable iter). The result is Sum of prime is: 142913828922 when compiled for 32-bit or 64-bit on Mac OS X 10.9.2 with GCC 4.8.2. ` –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 12 at 20:51
1  
Correction: The array is too large to be allocated on the stack. But that was already explained in the answer to your previous question stackoverflow.com/questions/22969072/…. –  Martin R Apr 12 at 20:56
1  
"wrong sum" — what does it print? What do you expect it to print? How do you know it's wrong? –  n.m. Apr 12 at 20:57
2  
@MichaelWalz: I was testing PRIME_LIMIT of 2000000 (two million), not 200000 (two hundred thousand). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 12 at 21:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you said in a comment, you did not include <math.h>. Then the compiler does not know the declarations of the sqrt() and ceil() functions:

double sqrt(double x);
double ceil(double x);

and you probably got warnings about "implicitly declared functions".

The compiler then assumes that these functions return an int and will therefore generate wrong code which can cause any kind of undefined behavior.

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Thank you! I learnt C from a Java programmer's view. I'm using VS 2013 and I'm a bit curious that why the compiler (intelligent sense feature of VS) doesn't give me an error when I use a function from a library that wasn't included in the code? –  Trung Bún Apr 12 at 21:47
    
No, it didn't give me that error. It just compile perfectly and give me random number each time –  Trung Bún Apr 12 at 21:48
1  
@TrungBún: It is allowed to call a function without declaring it first (for historic compatibility reasons). GCC and Clang give compiler warnings in that case. I do not have VS here, so I cannot explain why you don't get a warning. –  Martin R Apr 12 at 21:53

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