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Given that I have a class Base that has a single argument constructor with a TextBox object as it's argument. If I have a class Simple of the following form:

public class Simple extends Base {
  public Simple(){
    TextBox t = new TextBox();
    super(t);
    //wouldn't it be nice if I could do things with t down here?
  }
}

I will get a error telling me that the call to super must be the first call in a constructor. However, oddly enough, I can do this.

public class Simple extends Base {
  public Simple(){
    super(new TextBox());
  }
}

Why is it that this is permited, but the first example is not? I can understand needing to setup the subclass first, and perhaps not allowing object variables to be instantiated before the super-constructor is called. But t is clearly a method (local) variable, so why not allow it?

Is there a way to get around this limitation? Is there a good and safe way to hold variables to things you might construct BEFORE calling super but AFTER you have entered the constructor? Or, more generically, allowing for computation to be done before super is actually called, but within the constructor?

Thank you.

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2  
for what possible reason has this been tagged as gwt? Because you were trying it in gwt?? – user95947 Feb 20 '10 at 21:07
1  
TextBox was a GWT class, but no, it is not relevant I suppose. – Stephen Cagle Feb 20 '10 at 21:16
up vote 36 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a workaround for your simple case. You can create a private constructor that takes TextBox as an argument and call that from your public constructor.

public class Simple extends Base {
    private Simple(TextBox t) {
        super(t);
        // continue doing stuff with t here
    }

    public Simple() {
        this(new TextBox());
    }
}

For more complicated stuff, you need to use a factory or a static factory method.

share|improve this answer
    
This would appear to be a good answer to the question concerning how you would use the references to objects created after construction but before super. – Stephen Cagle Feb 20 '10 at 21:19
    
This is a very handy pattern, and pretty much lets you completely circumvent the requirement that super() not appear after anything else in the constructor. In extreme cases you can even chain multiple private constructors together, though I can't think of any situation where I've needed to do that, and if I did I'd probably start wondering if there was a better way to accomplish what I was doing. – Laurence Gonsalves Feb 20 '10 at 21:29
    
Yup. Others had already answered why it works like this in Java, I just wanted to point out one particular workaround. I think that for most other valid cases you can come up with, it's also possible to come up with an acceptable workaround. Now, to contradict myself, there is one case where this bit me: I was extending a class whose constructor had a Class parameter. I wanted to call super(this.getClass()), but since you are not allowed to reference this, that code was illegal, even though it seems perfectly reasonable that I should be able to know the actual class at this point. – waxwing Feb 20 '10 at 21:32
    
@waxwing - it may seem "perfectly reasonable", but it would entail treating the getClass() method as a special case in the JLS. Use <classname>.class instead. – Stephen C Feb 21 '10 at 2:45
    
Using <classname>.class was not an option in this case, because I was writing an abstract class that people could extend and I needed the instance's actual class. – waxwing Feb 21 '10 at 12:48

I had the same problem with computation before super call. Sometimes you want to check some conditions before calling super(). For example, you have a class that uses a lot of resources when created. the sub-class wants some extra data and might want to check them first, before calling the super-constructor. There is a simple way around this problem. might look a bit strange, but it works well:

Use a private static method inside your class that returns the argument of the super-constructor and make your checks inside:

public class Simple extends Base {
  public Simple(){
    super(createTextBox());
  }

  private static TextBox createTextBox() {
    TextBox t = new TextBox();
    t.doSomething();
    // ... or more
    return t;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

It is required by the language in order to ensure that the superclass is reliably constructed first. In particular, "If a constructor does not explicitly invoke a superclass constructor, the Java compiler automatically inserts a call to the no-argument constructor of the superclass."

In your example, the superclass may rely on the state of t at construction time. You can always ask for a copy later.

There's an extensive discussion here.

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Interestingly, it sounds like Java goes out of its way to prevent one of the most important cases where wrapping code around a superclass constructor call would be useful: ensuring that if a constructor throws an exception, things can get cleaned up. For example, if one of an object's constructor overloads reads out data from a passed-in file, a derived-class constructor might want have an overload which accepts a filename, passes the superclass constructor a newly-opened file, and then closes the file afterward. If the superclass constructor throws, how can the file get closed? – supercat May 21 '13 at 20:13
    
@supercat: You have to design for inheritance or preclude it [Bloch, EffectiveJava, §17]; see also this Q&A. – trashgod May 21 '13 at 21:42
    
If the construction of a subclass object requires an "acquire resource; construct superclass object; release resource" pattern, how should that be implemented? Pass the inner constructor an object that implements a single-interface method to be used in case of failure? Vaguely workable, perhaps, at the expense of chaining some extra levels of constructor calls. – supercat May 21 '13 at 21:56
    
I've had the luxury to fix the superclass or use composition; ping me if you pose this as a question. – trashgod May 22 '13 at 12:06

It's not possible without making it static. Either by

public class Simple extends Base {
    private static TextBox t = new TextBox();

    public Simple(){
        super(t);
    }
}

..or, if you want to do a bit more with it, using a static initializer:

public class Simple extends Base {
    private static TextBox t;

    static {
        t = new TextBox();
        t.doSomething();
    }

    public Simple(){
        super(t);
    }
}

It would however affect all instances of the same class and that's likely not what you want. Better would be to let the superclass assign TextBox as protected instance variable so that you can just access it in the subclass.

public class Base {
    protected TextBox t;
    public Base(TextBox t) {
        this.t = t;
    }
}

public class Simple extends Base {
    public Simple(){
        super(new TextBox());
        t.doSomething();
    }
}

If you actually want to have Base to do some specific stuff with the TextBox "beforehand", you'll need to instruct it with an extra constructor argument. E.g.

public class Base {
    protected TextBox t;
    public Base(TextBox t, String arg) {
        this.t = t;
        this.t.doSomething(arg);
    }
}

public class Simple extends Base {
    public Simple(){
        super(new TextBox(), "stuff");
    }
}

This can however also be done in the constructor of TextBox itself.

public class Simple extends Base {
    public Simple(){
        super(new TextBox("stuff"));
    }
}

public class TextBox {
    public TextBox(String arg) {
        this.doSomething(arg);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But the way you are using static, surely all instances of Simple share the same TextBox. – waxwing Feb 20 '10 at 21:08
    
That's correct, waxwing :) The OP was just asking for ways to do it the way he want. I also added "Better would be ...." afterwards with the constructor suggestion. I've however improved the question to warn a little more about that. – BalusC Feb 20 '10 at 21:10
    
I considered the static idea, but then I was worried about multithreading. Is there any guarantee that Java would not switch threads within the constructor, potentially changing the result of the static variable and screwing up the construction (when it eventually returns to the constructing thread). – Stephen Cagle Feb 20 '10 at 21:12
1  
There is no such guarantee indeed, a context switch can happen inside your constructor. Green-threads area is gone :) See a related issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/16717962/… – Laurent Grégoire Jul 3 '13 at 9:58

The reason why the second example is allowed but not the first is most likely to keep the language tidy and not introduce strange rules.

Allowing any code to run before super has been called would be dangerous since you might mess with things that should have been initialized but still haven't been. Basically, I guess you can do quite a lot of things in the call to super itself (e.g. call a static method for calculating some stuff that needs to go to the constructor), but you'll never be able to use anything from the not-yet-completely-constructed object which is a good thing.

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That's how Java works :-) There are technical reasons why it was chosen this way. It might indeed be odd that you can not do computations on locals before calling super, but in Java the object must first be allocated and thus it needs to go all the way up to Object so that all fields are correctly initialized before your could accidently moddify them.

In your case there is most of the time a getter that allows you to access the parameter your gave to super(). So you would use this:

super( new TextBox() );
final TextBox box = getWidget();
... do your thing...
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