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According to the HashSet javadoc, HashSet.contains only returns a boolean. How can I "find" an object in a hashSet and modify it (it's not a primitive data type)?

I see that HashTable has a get() method, but I would prefer to use the set.

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thanks everyone! My object actually contains a linked list i need to update frequently, so i think i'm going to just go with HashTable rather than do an expensive iteration for every object update. – user276712 Feb 20 '10 at 22:02
up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can remove an element and add a different one.

Modifying an object while it is in a hash set is a recipe for disaster (if the modification changes the hash value or equality behavior).

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1  
This is not totally true. It's safe to modify a HashSet element if the change doesn't impact the object's equality (and hash code). For example, if equals and hashCode were not overridden, then the change is safe to do as its equality is not changed. – Steve Kuo Feb 21 '10 at 2:52
2  
Yes, and that's why I wrote the part in parentheses. – starblue Feb 21 '10 at 8:44

To quote the source of the stock Sun java.util.HashSet:

public class HashSet<E>
    extends AbstractSet<E>
    implements Set<E>, Cloneable, java.io.Serializable
{
    static final long serialVersionUID = -5024744406713321676L;

    private transient HashMap<E,Object> map;

So you are paying for a map, you might as well use it.

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3  
I think you are trying to say "use a HashMap" ... correct? :-) – Stephen C Feb 21 '10 at 2:20
4  
Yes. Sorry, sometimes I can't resist the urge to make little puzzles out of answers. – bmargulies Feb 22 '10 at 1:26

You can iterate through the set to find your object.

A word of warning from the API doc though:

"Note: Great care must be exercised if mutable objects are used as set elements. The behavior of a set is not specified if the value of an object is changed in a manner that affects equals comparisons while the object is an element in the set."

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2  
"You can iterate ..." but of course if you do that, updating a set element becomes an O(N) operation. – Stephen C Feb 21 '10 at 2:19
Object oldobj; //object to modify
if (hashset.remove(oldobj)) {
   Object newobj; //modified object
   hashset.add(newobj);
}
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Something like:

MyObject obj = new MyObject();
HashSet hashSet = new HashSet();
hashSet.add(obj);

if (hashSet.contains(obj) == true) {
    hashSet.remove(obj);
    obj.setSomething();
    hashSet.add(obj);
}
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3  
1. == true - is unnecessary 2. you hasn't checked return value of .remove(obj) 3. .contains() is unnecessary if you removing at next step – Igor Artamonov Feb 20 '10 at 22:02
1  
Despide the fact that all is true, you shouldn't be so picky :) – kovica Feb 21 '10 at 22:09

I encountered the same problem and came up with the following solution (it should implement the Set interface but not all methods are here)

public class MySet<T> implements Set<T>{

    private HashMap<T,T> items = new HashMap<T,T>();


    public boolean contains(Object item) 
    {
        return items.containsKey(item);
    }

    public boolean add(T item) 
    {
        if (items.containsKey(item))
            return false;
        else
        {
            items.put(item, item);
            return true;
        }
    }

    public T get(T item) 
    {
        return items.get(item);
    }
}
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1  
There is no need to delegate. Simply use HashMap instead of HashSet. – mostruash May 25 '13 at 20:33

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