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In my actual project It happened accidentally here is my modified small program.

I can't figure out why it is giving output 10?

public class Int
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        int j=012;//accidentaly i put zero 
        System.out.println(j);// prints 10??
    }
}

After that i put two zeros still giving output 10.

Than I change 012 to 0123 and now it is giving output 83?

Can anyone explain why ?

Thanks In Advance.

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marked as duplicate by Donal Fellows, Grijesh Chauhan, Rico, Sajeetharan, mu 無 Apr 13 at 16:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
1 is decimal, 01 is octal, 0x1 is hexadecimal, 0b1 is binary (in Java SE 7) Edit: '1' is char, "1" is string. –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 at 9:45
    
Additionally, you may like to know that 08 is compilation error –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 at 9:51
    
@GrijeshChauhan ThankYou for your reply.I would rather accrepted your comment as an answer. :) your explanation is perfect and +1 for link. –  TAsk Apr 13 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Than I change 012 to 0123 and now it is giving output 83?

Because, it's taken as octal base (8), since that numeral have 0 in leading. So, it's corresponding decimal value is 10

012 :

2 * 8 ^ 0 + 1 * 8 ^ 1 = 10

0123 :

3 * 8 ^ 0 + 2 * 8 ^ 1 + 1 * 8 ^ 3 = 83
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The leading zero means the number is being interpreted as octal rather than decimal.

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1  
And what is 0 ? Octal or Decimal? –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 at 9:47
2  
@GrijeshChauhan Doesn't matter. 0 means nothing in both bases. –  The6P4C Apr 13 at 10:18
2  
@The6P4C I have quite a lot interest in formal theory. So it does matter to me :) Anyways, 0 in Java is a Decimal, In octal 00 is zero, likewise in Hex 0x0 is Zero. (further if you knows C++ 0 is interpreted as octal) –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 13 at 10:26
    
@GrijeshChauhan However, they are both equivalent, so the resulting number is the same. –  The6P4C Apr 13 at 23:45
    
@The6P4C yes, you are correct, magnitude wise both are equivalent but semantically different. –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 14 at 5:33

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