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I have a text file that i'm reading from and contains the following:

file "transform.in" .....:
10
@--------@
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
@---------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
----------
---------@
(end of file)

the following code that i use creates a segmation fault:

    #include <fstream>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>

    using namespace std;

    ifstream input("transform.in");
    ofstream output("transform.out");
    int n;
    char arxiko[10][10] = {0};
    string teliko = "", line;

    int main()
    {
        input >> n;
        for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
            input >> arxiko[i];
        for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
    {
        input >> line;
        teliko += line; // here, in the first iteration the segmation fault occurs
    }

If a line contains 9 characters instead of 10, there's no problem, but with 10 it crashes! Also, i did some test with the string += operator and i could append a string bigger than 10 characters succesfully, but why do i fail in this?

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1  
10 characters, with a terminating 0, makes 11 bytes. –  Karolis Juodelė Apr 13 '14 at 8:01
    
Why are you trying to use char** as well as std::string together? –  Garg Ankit Apr 13 '14 at 8:06
    
@gargankit because this is the segment of the code that produces the error. In the rest program i need the char**-strings to have 2 index values (arxiko[i][j]). –  manolismi Apr 13 '14 at 8:10
    
the problem though is with the += command –  manolismi Apr 13 '14 at 8:13
1  
The problem is that arxiko has exceeded its bounds so it has corrupted some parts of any variable that is declared after it. If you change the lower bound to 11 as suggested by others, that will stop the corruption. –  cup Apr 13 '14 at 8:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A string in C++ is always terminated by a NULL character, written as '\0'. Since the input file contains 10 characters per line, you might try something like this:

char arxiko[11][11] = {'\0'};
share|improve this answer
1  
The place where the problem surfaces is not necessarily where it was caused. You have use of a standard library class and hand-written memory management with raw arrays; the problem is pretty obviously the latter. –  Alan Stokes Apr 13 '14 at 8:59

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