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I have a class named "Human" and have a vector of humans and I populate it this way:

humans.push_back(Human());

and in another class, I have a vector human* pointing to the previous humans in this way:

cell.humans.push_back(&humans.back())

push_back function creates an object in heap memory and so the object won't change if the stack frames get changed. but apparently, by defining a variable like in a non-related function:

string foo = "a";

one of the humans' attributes are getting overridden and this is an unexpected behavior. but when I change the code in a way that the first human vector keeps a pointer of human like this:

humans.push_back(new Human())
cell.humans.push_back(humans.back())

the issue will be solved. to debug the program, I even used gdb and set a watchpoint on the changed object but gdb got stock in an infinite loop!!!

how can i explain this behavior?

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Show much more code. Your question is not clear enough. Use some smart pointer. –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 13 '14 at 8:03

2 Answers 2

push_back function creates an object in heap memory and so the object won't change if the stack frames get changed

Yes, but in this case, that object is just a pointer. Its validity depends on the validity of the object it points to. If the reference to humans.back() gets invalidated, then cell.humans' pointers be left dangling. De-referencing them would lead to undefined behaviour.

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the reason was interesting. when you push back a new object into a vector, the vector class may change the place and copy the previous objects into a new location(after pushing back a new object) but where are keeping the previous pointers that are now free and are invalidated.

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