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I am looking for an easy way in JavaScript to check if a number has a decimal place in it (is an integer). For instance,

23 -> OK
5 -> OK
3.5 -> not OK
34.345 -> not OK
if(number is integer) {...}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 146 down vote accepted

Using modulus will work:

num % 1 != 0
// 23.5 % 1 = 0.5
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possibly != 0, for negative values –  Jimmy Feb 20 '10 at 22:51
    
@Jimmy: true, I didn't account for negative input :-) Updated. –  Andy E Feb 20 '10 at 22:53
9  
Why the downvote? Is it a bad solution or did someone else want to get their answer noticed more? –  Andy E Feb 21 '10 at 5:49
2  
I didn't down vote but I'd say its something to do with 20.0, still has a decimal point and satisfies the above. +1 from me anyway for teaching me something new :) –  Abe Petrillo Sep 1 '11 at 16:53
1  
@Abe: true enough, though I think that's unlikely. It's impossible to say if 20.0 has a decimal point programmatically, unless it is expressed as a string. Also, none of the other solutions got a down vote for not tackling that ;-) –  Andy E Sep 1 '11 at 16:58

Or you could just use to find out if it is NOT a decimal:

string.indexOf(".")==-1;
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The most common solution is to strip the integer portion of the number and compare it to zero like so:

function Test()
{
     var startVal = 123.456
     alert( (startVal - Math.floor(startVal)) != 0 )
}
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13  
Why not just startVal != Math.floor(startVal)? –  Andy E Feb 21 '10 at 10:39
1  
Nice. Same concept, but your version is even cleaner. –  Thomas Feb 21 '10 at 15:56
    
@Andy E: This is possible only for positive numbers. It won't work for negative numbers.. –  Seeya K Apr 25 '13 at 4:27
1  
@SeeyaK: of course it will work for negative numbers. Please feel free to try it. –  Andy E Apr 25 '13 at 7:44
var re=/^-?[0-9]+$/;
var num=10;
re.test(num);
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4  
Fails for num= 999999999999999999999. –  bobince Feb 21 '10 at 0:14
    
convert to string first and then do the re. –  ghostdog74 Feb 21 '10 at 0:34
    
Worked for me without converting to string. –  Abe Petrillo Sep 2 '11 at 8:57

//How about byte-ing it?

Number.prototype.isInt= function(){
 return this== this>> 0;
}

I always feel kind of bad for bit operators in javascript-

they hardly get any exercise.

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6  
That fails for integers larger than 2^31 - 1, because >> converts the value to a signed 32-bit integer. –  Matthew Crumley Feb 21 '10 at 7:06
    
@kennebec awesome--that's by far the most amusing solution. And it is a heck of a lot better than a RegEx. –  Daniel B. Chapman Oct 24 '11 at 15:44
function isDecimal(n){
    if(n == "")
        return false;

    var strCheck = "0123456789";
    var i;

    for(i in n){
        if(strCheck.indexOf(n[i]) == -1)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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It'd be even better if you explained the code you posted. –  Alex Oct 27 '12 at 0:14
    
Doesn't need an explanation. It's pretty simple. –  Grant Birchmeier Aug 22 at 20:44

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