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I'm looking for a way to merge 4 separate lists of maps. I'm scraping a site that gives me a list of attrs in the form of data* below...

(def data1 '("1" "1" "1" "1"))
(def data2 '("2" "2" "2" "2"))
(def data3 '("3" "3" "3" "3"))
(def data4 '("4" "4" "4" "4"))

...and them I'm organizing them according to keys:

(map #(assoc {} :a %) data1)
(map #(assoc {} :b %) data2)
(map #(assoc {} :c %) data3)
(map #(assoc {} :d %) data4)

That code above produces the following data structure:

({:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"})
({:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"})
({:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"})
({:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"})

I want to combine these lists vertically, so I have the following:

(def want [{:a "1", :b "2", :c "3", :d "4"}
           {:a "1", :b "2", :c "3", :d "4"}
           {:a "1", :b "2", :c "3", :d "4"}
           {:a "1", :b "2", :c "3", :d "4"}])

This would allow me to iterate over the list of maps and select a specific value from each map, spitting them out on a webpage. But I'm not sure how to get the data structure I want. Any help is appreciated...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Its not clear to me why you would do the intermediate step of

(map #(assoc {} :a %) ...)

If your data is

(def data [["1" "1" "1" "1"] 
           ["2" "2" "2" "2"] 
           ["3" "3" "3" "3"] 
           ["4" "4" "4" "4"]])

And your keys are

(def my-keys [:a :b :c :d])

Then you can just use zipmap

(mapv zipmap (repeat my-keys) (apply map list data))


;=> [{:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
;    {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
;    {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
;    {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}]

Note the (apply map list data) is used to transpose the data to the correct orientation with respect to the keys.

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In short, this worked after changing (apply map list data) to (mapv vector data). The data are generated in 4 separate sexprs, actually select functions from the Enlive library. Each select pulls out a different element: first the href's, then the a text, etc. So I have a long list of href's, another list of text describing the link, etc. I assoc the respective keys as a way to describe the link attribute before merging them into maps. –  Ben Sima Apr 13 '14 at 21:21

Map takes every combination of firsts, seconds, etc. from the provided collections and performs a function on each. So it's quite good for transposing collections. Vector is shown here as the simplest function to illustrate the transposition:

(map vector
  [{:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"}]
  [{:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"}]
  [{:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"}]
  [{:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"}]))

=>([{:a "1"} {:b "2"} {:c "3"} {:d "4"}]
   [{:a "1"} {:b "2"} {:c "3"} {:d "4"}]
   [{:a "1"} {:b "2"} {:c "3"} {:d "4"}]
   [{:a "1"} {:b "2"} {:c "3"} {:d "4"}])

Merge combines hash-maps:

(merge {:a "1"} {:b "2"} {:c "3"} {:d "4"})
=> {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}

Combine the two for the effect you want:

(map merge
     [{:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"} {:a "1"}]
     [{:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"} {:b "2"}]
     [{:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"} {:c "3"}]
     [{:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"} {:d "4"}]))

=>({:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
   {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
   {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"}
   {:d "4", :c "3", :b "2", :a "1"})
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1  
mapv rather than map? –  Thumbnail Apr 13 '14 at 16:22
    
Whyever would you ? There's no indication in the question how the result would be used, it could very well be needed to be lazy. –  NielsK Apr 13 '14 at 16:25
    
want is presented as a vector, and we're told it would be used to iterate over the list of maps and select a specific value from each map. –  Thumbnail Apr 13 '14 at 16:26
    
There's not really a way to present a want in def form to be lazy. –  NielsK Apr 13 '14 at 16:27

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