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I've a game server and it uses a database to read/write info about accounts and stuff. Thing is, the server has 1 database connection, which I init from the the start of the server. Like this

// .hpp
namespace database
{
    void Init();    // call this when the server starts

    bool ReadUser(std::string &id, std::string &pass, int salt);
    // rest of functions
}


// .cpp
namespace database
{
    Database n_db;

    Init()
    {
        if (n_db != init)
        {
            // init here
        }
    }

    // use n_db for the rest
}

Is that bad practice?

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2  
Why not make it a database class instead of a namespace? That way, for example, you can ensure that you always Init() (as part of the constructor). –  Mats Petersson Apr 13 '14 at 16:17
    
If i make a class about it, I have to pass this class around in the program forever. It seems cleaner though –  NLScotty Apr 13 '14 at 16:39
    
Or make it a global - it's no different from having a global VARIABLE that happens to be inside a namespace - it's still a global whether it is inside a namespace or not, and only a small portion of the problems with globals is solves by putting it inside a namespace. –  Mats Petersson Apr 13 '14 at 16:43
    
@Mats: Except that this namespace-scoped variable seems not to be used outside the single compilation unit. –  Ben Voigt Apr 13 '14 at 17:07
    
@BenVoigt: True. But having a class is still, in my view, preferrable. –  Mats Petersson Apr 13 '14 at 21:18

3 Answers 3

Yes, it is generally considered bad practice. Global variables are frowned upon by most programmers.

Instead of using a global you should move the free functions as method of your classes Server and Database. Your server should have one database (composition). Somewhere in the code, you should instantiate and manage the ownership of a single Server object.

This has the advantage of being more easily reusable when you get to the point were you may want more than one server, and more than one database.

If you really want to have a single instance of the server, you may want to use the Singleton pattern which is essentially a global variable with a fancy hat.

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You should add that variable to class. If not it will be seen as global variable of namespace.

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It is a bad practice. C++ is not a very strict language when it comes to what namespace can contain. On another though, C++ is not a strict language at all. But, to make your code robust and also readable. It is recommended that you store only types in your namespaces. These can contain classes, structs, enums, or even constant expressions. But don't declare functions right inside the namespace. This is how I would rewrite your code:

// .hpp
namespace database
{
    class DatabaseClass
    {

        void Init();    // call this when the server starts

        bool ReadUser(std::string &id, std::string &pass, int salt);
        // rest of functions
    }
}

// .cpp
using namespace database;
DatabaseClass::Init()
{
}
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