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I just declared

public static class DefaultComparers
{
    public readonly IComparer TextComparer = new TextComparer(new CompositeIndexedComparer<string>());

    private static IDictionary<string, IComparer> DefaultComparers()
    {
       return new Dictionary<string, IComparer>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) {
                {"txt", TextComparer}
       };
    }
}

however in the same namespace is already a class called TextComparer and hence the DefaultComparers method doesn't compile. If it was a non-static method I could easily fix it by using this.TextComparer. What is the alternative in static context?

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You can prefix it with the namespace. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Apr 13 at 18:36
    
The answer from Reza gives a reason why DefaultComparers method can't have the same name as its containing class. However, having a field TextComparer with the same name as an "exterior" type should not lead to compile-time errors. Not that it is wise ... However, are you trying to access a non-static field from a static method? Well no, you can't have a non-static member in a static class, so that is one additional problem with your code. Please try to give a more exact picture of what code you have! –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Apr 13 at 19:44
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum The question is very confused, but there is no need to qualify if one is a type and the other is a field/variable. The compiler will know from context if a type or a value is expected. However, when you need to qualify a static member, instead of this.MemberName, you use ClassName.MemberName. Namespace is not needed except if there is something the asker didn't tell us. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Apr 13 at 19:52
    
@JeppeStigNielsen you are of course correct, I assumed OP was using the terminology incorrectly and needed to qualify a class name from a namespace. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Apr 13 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

The name of this method is as same as your class, which can't be, compiler suppose it as constructor for your class so it shouldn't have return type

private static IDictionary<string, IComparer> DefaultComparers()
{
   return new Dictionary<string, IComparer>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) {
            {"txt", TextComparer}
   };
}
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Your question seems based on wrong premises. Your code has several other problems, but the problem you ask for, is non-existent. This compiles flawlessly:

class ConflictName
{
}
class GoodName
{
    static object ConflictName = new ConflictName();

    static Dictionary<string, object> ANOTHERGoodName()
    {
        return new Dictionary<string, object>
        {
            { "txt", ConflictName }
        };
    }
}

The compiler knows the difference between a type (the class ConflictName) and a value (the field ConflictName inside the second class).

However, in other cases where it is necessary to qualify a static member (for example because it is hidden by a local variable defined inside the same method), you just prefix the class name, e.g. GoodName.ConflictName instead of just ConflictName.

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