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Inspired by this question, I tried the following code:

struct A {
  virtual void doit() const = 0;
};

struct B : public A {
  virtual void doit() const;
};

struct C : public A {
  virtual void doit() const;
};

void
foo(bool p)
{
  const A &a = (p ? static_cast<const A &>(B()) : static_cast<const A &>(C()));
  a.doit();
}

Every compiler I have tried accepts this code with -Wall -Werror and generates the assembly I want. But after carefully reading the C++03 specification section 12.2 ("Temporaries") and section 5.12 ("Conditional Operator"), I am unsure whether this is guaranteed to work.

So, is this valid code, or does it invoke undefined behavior? Does the answer differ for C++03 and C++11?

Citations from relevant specifications would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
1  
    
Looks perfectly fine to me... What, specifically, is your concern? –  ildjarn Apr 14 at 0:26
4  
Also relevant: open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/cwg_closed.html#1568 I think open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/cwg_defects.html#1376 suggests that you get a dangling reference due to the cast. –  dyp Apr 14 at 0:27
    
@ildjarn: Both dangling references and "slicing" seem like things that could go wrong, at least in principle. –  Nemo Apr 14 at 0:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Oh, it's very invalid.

Consider:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct A {
    virtual ~A() { cout << "~A" << endl; }
    virtual void doit() const = 0;
};

struct B : public A
{
    ~B() override { cout << "~B" << endl; }
    void doit() const override { cout << "A::doit" << endl; }
};

struct C : public A
{
    ~C() override { cout << "~C" << endl; }
    virtual void doit() const { cout << "C::doit" << endl; }
};

void foo(bool p)
{
    cout << "foo( " << p << ")" << endl;
    const A &a = (p ? static_cast<const A &>(B()) : static_cast<const A &>(C()));
    a.doit();
}

auto main( int argc, char* argv[] ) -> int
{
    cout << boolalpha;

    foo( true );
    cout << endl;
    foo( false );
}

Output in Coliru Viewer, using g++ 4.8:

foo( true)

~B

~A

pure virtual method called

terminate called without an active exception

bash: line 7: 16922 Aborted                 (core dumped) ./a.out

It's UB so any explanation could be true, but one can be reasonably sure, without looking at the assembly, that what happens is:

  • A temporary is constructed.
  • It's bound to the reference.
    This is a reference being bound to a reference, so does not involve creation of a new temporary or slice.
  • The temporary is destroyed.
  • As part of that its dynamic type (vtable pointer) is changed to A, which is abstract.
  • The pure virtual in A is called.
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, sorry for imperfect code, I see that I didn't manage to change declarations to override everywhere. And re the standardeese, it's night here in Norway, and I need some rest before getting up in a few hours. Howevever, perhaps answer should be extended with some clarifying note that the question is not lifetime extension. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 14 at 1:14
    
Without going into discussion how awful code in question is, why isn't temporary bound to the const reference? Shouldn't it extend the lifetime until end of the scope? I think that is what OP expected. –  BЈовић Apr 14 at 7:27
    
@BЈовић: as noted by dyp in question comments there is an as yet unresolved defect report concerning the isse, DR 1376. The problem there is that the effect of a static_cast to reference is defined in terms of an invented "temporary" object. But that's just a wording problem. The lifetime extension only applies to direct binding of a temporary. Binding a reference to a reference does not extend lifetime, essentially because defining it properly (e.g. disallowing reference produced by function call) would be complicated. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 14 at 11:09
1  
+1, although how one compiler happens to behave does not fully resolve the question. I will wait to see if anyone cares to cite chapter and verse of the spec; if nobody does that in the next few days, I will accept this answer. –  Nemo Apr 14 at 18:25

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