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In order to tackle the issue of saving background tasks across configuration changes, I've decided instead of retaining a fragment, to do the following:

  • in onSaveInstanceState(Bundle savedState):
    • cancel any currently running tasks
    • put their id's in the bundle
  • in onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle savedState):
    • restart any tasks, whose id's are in the bundle

Since the tasks I'm dealing with are not particularly long, restarting them isn't an issue, it's not like I'm downloading a big file or something.

Here's what my TaskManager looks like:

public class BackgroundTaskManager {
    // Executor Service to run the tasks on
    private final ExecutorService              executor;        
    // list of current tasks
    private final Map<String, BackgroundTask>  pendingTasks;
    // handler to execute stuff on the UI thread
    private final Handler                      handler;

    public BackgroundTaskManager(final ExecutorService executor) {
        this.executor = executor;        
        this.pendingTasks = new HashMap<String, BackgroundTask>();        
        this.handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
    }

    private void executeTask(final BackgroundTask task) {
       // execute the background job in the background
       executor.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                task.doInBackground();
                handler.post(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        // manipulate some views
                        task.onPostExecute();
                        // remove the task from the list of current tasks
                        pendingTasks.remove(task.getId());                        
                        // check if the list of current tasks is empty
                    }
                 });
            }
        });
    }

    /**
     * Adds a task to the manager and executes it in the background
     * 
     * @param task
     *            the task to be added
     */
    public void addTask(final BackgroundTask task) {        
        pendingTasks.put(task.getId(), task);
        executeTask(task);
    }

    public void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        // check if there are pendingTasks
        if (!pendingTasks.isEmpty()) {
            executor.shutdown();            
            savedInstanceState.putStringArray("pending tasks", pendingTasks.keySet().toArray(new String [1]));
        }
    }
}

So, pendingTasks.put() and pendingTasks.remove() is executed only on the UI thread, provided that I call addTask() in the UI thread, so I don't need any synchronization.

At this point, I've got some questions:

  • Are the activity lifecycle methods onSaveInstanceState() and onRestoreInstanceState() executed on the UI thread?
  • Does executor.shutdown() return immediately?

The documentation says that executor.shutdown() awaits any previously submitted tasks to complete. So, from the point of view of an executor service, a task is completed after its last command is executed, in this case handler.post(). So, if I have any pending tasks when I'm in onSaveInstanceState(), it is possible that after the executor has shut down, the UI thread will have some posted runnables to execute, right? And since I'm in onSaveInstanceState() the activity is probably going to be destroyed, and in onRestoreInstanceState() I will have a new activity? So what happens to the runnables, in which I manipulate some old views? Will these runnables be executed immediately after the activity is recreated? Wouldn't it be better if, before I post a runnable to the UI thread, I check if the executor is currently shutting down and do it only if it isn't? In this case can I be absolutely sure that executor.isShutdown() will return true after I've called executor.shutDown() or do I have to wait any tasks to complete?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Are the activity lifecycle methods onSaveInstanceState() and onRestoreInstanceState() executed on the UI thread?

    Yes

  • The documentation says that executor.shutdown() awaits any previously submitted tasks to complete.

    No. Where did you see that documentation? ExecutorService.shutdown reads: This method does not wait for previously submitted tasks to complete execution. Use awaitTermination to do that.

    • So what happens to the runnables, in which I manipulate some old views?

    Nothing good. The activity they address is already destroyed. You should raise a flag and either abandon task.onPostExecute(), or save it until activity is recreated. Note you cannot save them in onSaveInstanceState() - the runnables themselves should take into account, whether the activity is alive.

    • Will these runnables be executed immediately after the activity is recreated?

    No, until you take care of them. Recreating activity should not only restart background tasks, but also runnables with onPostExecute.

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I'm sorry, I should have made myself clearer. I meant that after executor.shutdown() is called, any currently running tasks will be completed, not terminated prematurely. So does executor.shutdown() return immediately and can I rely on executor.isShutdown() returning true afterwards? –  Daniel Rusev Apr 14 at 13:55
    
executor.shutdown() return immediately and executor.isShutdown() become true, but to check if all tasks have finished use isTerminated(). –  Alexei Kaigorodov Apr 14 at 14:26
    
What if, when I enter onSaveInstanceState() and before I have the change to shut the executor down, the UI thread has already been posted some runnables. Is it possible to enter onSaveInstanceState() with the UI thread having been posted some runnables waiting to be executed, or Android makes sure this doesn't happen? –  Daniel Rusev Apr 14 at 17:48

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