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Here are two functions which I claim do exactly the same thing:

bool fast(int x)
{
  return x & 4242;
}

bool slow(int x)
{
  return x && (x & 4242);
}

Logically they do the same thing, and just to be 100% sure I wrote a test that ran all four billion possible inputs through both of them, and they matched. But the assembly code is a different story:

fast:
    andl    $4242, %edi
    setne   %al
    ret

slow:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    testl   %edi, %edi
    je      .L3
    andl    $4242, %edi
    setne   %al
.L3:
    rep
    ret

I was surprised that GCC could not make the leap of logic to eliminate the redundant test. I tried g++ 4.4.3 and 4.7.2 with -O2, -O3, and -Os, all of which generated the same code. The platform is Linux x86_64.

Can someone explain why GCC shouldn't be smart enough to generate the same code in both cases? I'd also like to know if other compilers can do better.

Edit to add test harness:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // make vector filled with numbers starting from argv[1]
    int seed = atoi(argv[1]);
    vector<int> v(100000);
    for (int j = 0; j < 100000; ++j)
        v[j] = j + seed;

    // count how many times the function returns true
    int result = 0;
    for (int j = 0; j < 100000; ++j)
        for (int i : v)
            result += slow(i); // or fast(i), try both

    return result;
}

I tested the above with clang 5.1 on Mac OS with -O3. It took 2.9 seconds using fast() and 3.8 seconds using slow(). If I instead use a vector of all zeros, there is no significant difference in performance between the two functions.

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19  
how are those two functions doing same thing? The first one returns an int (x & 4242) while the second one returns either 1 or 0. –  Don't You Worry Child Apr 14 at 8:53
19  
@MadHatter: How can bool fast(int x) return any int at all? Both versions return true if and only if x contains at least one of the bits in 4242. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 8:58
13  
@DevSolar: you could say the same thing of dead code elimination, but compilers still do it. There are various means by which people write or auto-generate sub-optimal code, and it's useful when the compiler improves it. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 at 9:01
13  
@DevSolar: it's not a fallacy in this case. The question is about the motivations of the authors of GCC and the decisions they made. If you are an author of GCC responsible for this aspect of optimizations, then your statements about the role of the optimizer are more relvant than those of an author of MSVC saying the same thing. Similarly if you could could cite GCC authors agreeing with your opinion on compilers, that would be more of an answer than just stating your opinion on compilers would be. Ofc you aren't claiming it's an answer, it's a comment :-) –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 at 9:07
13  
@DevSolar Ah, the "all points of view have the same weight" fallacy, I like that one :-) –  juanchopanza Apr 14 at 9:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You are correct that this appears to be a deficiency, and possibly an outright bug, in the optimizer.

Consider:

bool slow(int x)
{
  return x && (x & 4242);
}

bool slow2(int x)
{
  return (x & 4242) && x;
}

Assembly emitted by GCC 4.8.1 (-O3):

slow:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    testl   %edi, %edi
    je      .L2
    andl    $4242, %edi
    setne   %al
.L2:
    rep ret

slow2:
    andl    $4242, %edi
    setne   %al
    ret

In other words, slow2 is misnamed.

I have only contributed the occasional patch to GCC, so whether my point of view carries any weight is debatable :-). But it is certainly strange, in my view, for GCC to optimize one of these and not the other. I suggest filing a bug report.

[Update]

Surprisingly small changes appear to make a big difference. For example:

bool slow3(int x)
{
  int y = x & 4242;
  return y && x;
}

...generates "slow" code again. I have no hypothesis for this behavior.

You can experiment with all of these on multiple compilers here.

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2  
Logical AND is short-circuited, right? That may explain why putting it on the left-hand side does that. –  2rs2ts Apr 14 at 14:33
    
Not entirely strange, but it helps understand why things fail. (bool)(x & 4242) implies (bool)x but not vice versa. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 14:33
    
@2rs2ts: There's a deleted answer which stated the same. Point is, the optimizer knows that there's no point in short-circuiting because there are no observable side effects on either side. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 14:36
    
@MSalters I was going to say that the optimizer ought to know that there are no side-effects, but I didn't know if it'd infer anything from that. Thanks for pointing that ought, very cool. –  2rs2ts Apr 14 at 14:39
2  
@2rs2ts: The optimizer absolutely has to know, for instance to make CSE possible. That's not allowed if that CSE has side effects (which should happen each time). –  MSalters Apr 14 at 14:44

Exactly why should it be able to optimize the code? You're assuming that any transformation that works will be done. That's not at all how optimizers work. They're not Artificial Intelligences. They simply work by parametrically replacing known patterns. E.g. the "Common Subexpression Elimination" scans an expression for common subexpressions, and moves them forwards, if that does not change side effects.

(BTW, CSE shows that optimizers are already quite aware of what code movement is allowed in the possible presence of side effects. They know that you have to be careful with &&. Whether expr && expr can be CSE-optimized or not depends on the side effects of expr.)

So, in summary: which pattern do you think applies here?

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9  
We know that GCC has many ways of establishing equivalent arithmetic expressions and relations between expressions, which it uses at the point of emitting code if not before. One might naively assume the pattern: "given side-effect-free A && B, if (bool)B is false whenever (bool)A is false, transform to B". But of course that has performance implications when A is faster to evaluate than B. Those implications might even be the answer to the question, I just don't know. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 at 9:14
6  
@SteveJessop: The particular form A&&B where B implies A is not exactly rare; it's a common (human) optimization to first calculate a fast A expression before calculating the expensive B. E.g. check !string::empty() before creating a regex even if that regex would do the right thing on an empty input. So as an optimizer writer I'd leave those A && B alone. That might very well be the answer indeed. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 9:47
4  
Yep. It may not be high priority but I think there's still a question whether, for arithmetic expressions, the compiler should make its own assessment of the performance of A and B, ignoring what some dumb-ass sack of giblets thinks on the subject. Which is kind of what I want from a compiler ;-) As you pointed out, templates produce code where the case for a specific type is "obviously" written wrongly, but I don't want to have to specialize for performance. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 at 10:03
1  
@JohnZwinck: That's why I wrote "implies", in particular "B implies A". –  MSalters Apr 14 at 12:20
2  
Or don't make a truth table. An SMT solver could trivially solve this problem. Not all problems, obviously, but it could solve this one. –  harold Apr 14 at 12:56

This is how your code looks in ARM which should make slow run faster when input it 0.

fast(int):
    movw    r3, #4242
    and r3, r0, r3
    adds    r0, r3, #0
    movne   r0, #1
    bx  lr
slow(int):
    cmp r0, #0
    bxeq    lr
    movw    r3, #4242
    and r3, r0, r3
    adds    r0, r3, #0
    movne   r0, #1
    bx  lr

However GCC would optimize very nicely when you start using such trivial functions anyway.

bool foo() {
    return fast(4242) && slow(42);
}

becomes

foo():
    mov r0, #1
    bx  lr

My point is sometimes such code requires more context to be optimized further so why would implementers of optimizers (improvers!) should bother?

Another example:

bool bar(int c) {
  if (fast(c))
    return slow(c);
}

becomes

bar(int):
    movw    r3, #4242
    and r3, r0, r3
    cmp r3, #0
    movne   r0, #1
    bxne    lr
    bx  lr
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7  
Well, duh - if you pass in constants, GCC can calculate the result directly. It has to have this capability, for constexpr. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 9:39
    
@MSalters that was actually my point, in that case constants provides a context. added one more example, dead code elimination? –  auselen Apr 14 at 9:51
1  
The problem was that the two snippets are identical for 4 billion possible inputs, not just one. It's reasonable for the compiler to test the one set of arguments you explicitly provided, but not to test all 4 billion possible arguments. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 12:23
1  
+1 for pointing out that slow can be faster if x == 0 –  James_pic Apr 14 at 14:03
    
@James_pic: One problem with the notion of leaving optimization up to compilers is that compilers have no way of knowing whether x==0 is going to be true 99% of the time, 0.00001% of the time, or somewhere in between. If it happens to be true 90% of the time, an optimization that saves one cycle on that 90% case and wastes four on the 10% case would save half a cycle on the average case. –  supercat Apr 14 at 18:06

To perform this optimization, one needs to study the expression for two distinct cases: x == 0, simplifying to false, and x != 0, simplifying to x & 4242. And then be smart enough to see that the value of the second expression also yields the correct value even for x == 0.

Let us imagine that the compiler performs a case study and finds simplifications.

If x != 0, the expression simplifies to x & 4242.

If x == 0, the expression simplifies to false.

After simplification, we obtain two completely unrelated expressions. To reconcile them, the compiler should ask unnatural questions:

If x != 0, can false be used instead of x & 4242 anyway ? [No]

If x == 0, can x & 4242 be used instead of false anyway ? [Yes]

share|improve this answer
    
The "range" 0 is often checked for specifically, because of its atypical behavior in many operations. Quite a lot of binary operations can be simplified if either of the arguments is zero, both arithmetic and logical/boolean. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 12:27
    
@MSalters: yes, simplifying an expression in special/frequent cases is doable. It is not just that. It is simplifying the expression and checking that it matches another expression when the specific value is used. Otherwise, the transformed code could be an inefficient x ? x & 4242 : false; –  Yves Daoust Apr 14 at 13:07
1  
@MSalters: I don't agree with that. It is easy to see that for x == 0 the expression simplifies to false, and for x != 0 it simplifies to x & 4242. Hence the rewrite x ? x & 4242 : false. Now the unnatural step is to try and get rid of the ? operator by looking for properties of the subexpressions outside of the domains for which they were established, and discover that by chance x & 4242 fits everywhere [in fact, establishing that x ? x & 4242 : false is equivalent to x ? x & 4242 : x & 4242]. –  Yves Daoust Apr 14 at 13:35
1  
I'm not proposing a particularly difficult rewrite. Substitute left in right and right in left, that's all. Obviously 0 & 4242 is a valid substitute for false. Finding a third expression that's the union of two unrelated expressions would be hard, though. –  MSalters Apr 14 at 13:48
2  
I don't think it's much of a leap for the optimizer to investigate x == 0 as a special case when x is the operand of &&. It's not an unrealistic brute force to look at both legs of a binary choice! The only question for the optimizer to ask is, "does (bool)(x & 4242) imply (bool)x?". It's easy to see that it does (at any rate, no harder to see than plenty of pinhole optimizations that GCC does make with arithmetic expressions), so the optimizer could see that the branch is logically redundant if it thought the issue worth investigation. –  Steve Jessop Apr 14 at 14:01

It is mildly interesting to note that this optimisation is not valid on all machines. Specifically if you run on a machine which uses the one's complement representation of negative numbers then:

-0 & 4242 == true
-0 && ( -0 & 4242 ) == false

GCC has never supported such representations, but they are allowed for by the C standard.

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4  
An interesting observation, but not an "important" one. This question is about the behavior of a particular compiler, so it is already platform-dependent. And every platform ever supported by GCC -- indeed, every platform whatsoever for the past 40+ years -- has used two's complement. –  Nemo Apr 17 at 3:36
    
You're right. However, it does highlight how seemingly trivial optimisations can have unexpected exceptions. Consideration of all these edge cases makes implementation of simple optimisations very time-consuming. –  andrew.punnett Apr 22 at 23:05

C places fewer restrictions on the behavior of signed integral types then unsigned integral types. Negative values in particular can legally do strange things with bit operations. If any possible arguments to the bit operation have legally unconstrained behavior, the compiler can't remove them.

For example, "x/y==1 or true" might crash the program if you divide by zero, so the compiler can't ignore the evaluation of the division. Negative signed values and bit operations never actually do things like that on any common system, but I'm not sure the language definition rules it out.

You should try the code with unsigned ints and see if that helps. If it does you'll know it's an issue with the types and not the expression.

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2  
You got it exactly backwards. If the input values would lead to unspecified or undefined behavior, the compiler has full freedom of implementation. For instance, in x/y==1 or true, the compiler may assume three lines earlier (!!) that y != 0. That legal because the compiler may assume there is no Undefined Behavior whatsoever. As a result, UB can appear to travel backwards in time. –  MSalters Apr 15 at 0:11
    
Changing to unsigned generates exactly the same code. –  Nemo Apr 15 at 1:26

The last compiler I worked on did not do these sorts of optimizations. Writing an optimizer to take advantage of optimizations related to combining binary and logical operators will not speed up the applications. The main reason for this is that people do not use binary operators like that very often. Many people don't feel comfortable with binary operators and those that do will typically not write useless operations that need to be optimized.

If I go to the trouble of writing

return (x & 4242)

and I understand what that means why would I bother with the extra step. For the same reason i would not write this suboptimal code

if (x==0) return false;
if (x==1) return true;
if (x==0xFFFEFD6) return false;
if (x==4242) return true;
return (x & 4242)

There is just better use of compiler dev's time than to optimize stuff that makes no difference. There are just so many bigger fish to fry in compiler optimization.

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