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Why are there non generic versions of binary search in Java?

Is it because they don't want to crash existing implementations?

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Which BS implementation are you talking about ? –  kocko Apr 14 at 9:40
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Sure there are generic versions of that method. –  Rohit Jain Apr 14 at 9:40
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@kocko: I had to read that a second time before my brain took in the appropriate meaning of BS. –  W.K.S Apr 14 at 9:44
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@W.K.S … I honestly didn’t get it until your comment. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 14 at 9:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is of course a generic version of binarySearch1.

The reason why there are non-generic overloads is performance: value types would need to be boxed (and thus copied) in order to be able to use a generic binarySearch. Same goes for sort and other algorithms.


1 In fact there’s more than one generic overload but that’s not relevant here.

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Ok, so what's the difference between generics in Java and Templates, since in C++ they only have one Binary Search. –  Merni Apr 14 at 10:00
    
    
"Performance" has nothing to do with it. –  newacct Apr 15 at 9:02
    
@newacct Of course it does. OP is probably not talking about the Object overload (otherwise I’d agree) but about the separate overloads for all primitive types (point 1 in your answer). And here performance is everything, because lack of the separate overloads means that we would need to copy the array (to box the values) in order to call the method. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 15 at 9:16
    
@KonradRudolph: The lack of separate overloads means that you cannot use it with arrays of primitives. Of course you can copy the array but that's a completely separate thing. –  newacct Apr 15 at 9:21

It is unclear what "non generic versions of binary search" you are talking about.

  1. If you are talking about the versions of binarySearch that take arrays of primitive types, it's because generics only apply to reference types, so a generic binary search method could not possibly handle arrays of primitive types.

  2. If you are talking about the versions of binarySearch that take Object[]:

    public static int binarySearch(Object[] a, Object key)
    public static int binarySearch(Object[] a, int fromIndex, int toIndex, Object key)
    

    How would they make it generic?

    • Option 1: public static <T> int binarySearch(T[] a, T key)

      In this case, there is no benefit to making it generic.

      The following two method signatures would be equivalent -- any set of arguments that you can pass to one, you can pass to the other:

      public static int binarySearch(Object[] a, Object key)
      public static <T> int binarySearch(T[] a, T key)
      

      This is because 1) T can be chosen to be Object, so the generic version includes the non-generic version; and 2) any reference array type is a subtype of Object[], and any reference type is a subtype of Object, so the non-generic version includes the generic version.

      Since they are equivalent, and thus the T is useless, the simpler version (without the generic type parameter) is better.

    • Option 2: they could have made it

      public static <T extends Object & Comparable<? super T>>
          int binarySearch(T[] a, T key)
      

      but this would break compatibility with old code depending on it taking Object[] and Object (without any constraint on it being a type that is comparable to itself). APIs that take previously non-generic classes that now take a parameterized type do not break compatibility, because old code would still work with raw types. However, in this case, raw types do not help because arrays are reified both before and after generics.

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“The following two method signatures would be equivalent” – no they are not. The generic signature ensures that all values in the array have the same type T (or one derived from that). The first signature places no such restriction on the array, it can contain values of wildly different types. Using generics here is anything but useless. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 15 at 9:18
    
@KonradRudolph: "ensures that all values in the array have the same type T (or one derived from that)" Right. All reference types in Java derive from Object. "Using generics here is anything but useless." Try to find one example of inputs that can be used with one method but not the other. –  newacct Apr 15 at 9:23
    
“All reference types in Java derive from Object” – so in other words, that’s a tautology, and saying nothing. – “Try to find one example of inputs that can be used with one method but not the other” – that’s not the point. The point is that the generic signature is more restricted. That’s a good thing! Good APIs are not liberal, they are restrictive because only like that we can use the compiler to provide useful diagnostics. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 15 at 9:29
    
@KonradRudolph: Yes, so what you said is a tautology and does't mean anything. "The point is that the generic signature is more restricted." The point is that it is NOT more restricted. There is no case where it "restricts". It's like saying that <T> void print(T x) is "more restricted" than void print(Object x). It is not. –  newacct Apr 15 at 9:45
    
No, it’s not the same thing, because in the print case there’s only one value. In the case of binarySearch there are multiple values and the type T expresses something about the relation between their types. Of course you can always bind T to Object, in which case these two are truly identical. But you can also (explicitly or implicitly) bind T to another, more restricted type, if you so wish: Arrays.<Integer>binarySearch(arr, key, comp); (and you don’t always need to specify the generic type, Java will tell you if the parameter types mismatch). –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 15 at 9:53

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