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I have a text file that contains the following data. For example, aa.txt has some numbers. I need to extract the continuous numbers(minimum 3 numbers) from it.How can I do this with awk?

>aa.txt
31
35
36
37
38
39    
44
169
170
173
174
175
177
206 
>1a.txt
39
40
41
42
146
149
151

My desired output is shown below.

>aa.txt
35
36 
37
38
39
173
174
175
>1a.txt
 39
 40
 41
 42
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closed as off-topic by Wooble, laaposto, Somnath Muluk, fedorqui, Adrian Frühwirth Apr 15 at 11:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – Wooble, laaposto, Somnath Muluk, fedorqui, Adrian Frühwirth
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Have you tried anything so far? –  Nick L. Apr 14 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using awk and you example data:

awk 'f+1==$0 {a++} f+1!=$0 {if (a>1) {for (i=f-a;i<=f;i++) print i}a=0} {f=$0}' file
35
36
37
38
39
173
174
175
39
40
41
42

Some more readable:

awk '
f+1==$0 {
    a++} 
f+1!=$0 {
    if (a>1) {
        for (i=f-a;i<=f;i++)
            print i
        }a=0
    }
    {f=$0}
    ' file

How to print file name:

awk 'FNR==1 {print ">"FILENAME} f+1==$0 {a++} f+1!=$0 {if (a>1) {for (i=f-a;i<=f;i++) print i}a=0} {f=$0}' *

Change the * to match your file criteria.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer.In the output, I need to print the file name from which it is extracted. Is it possible? Could you please explain the code? –  user3531678 Apr 15 at 10:06
    
@user3531678 Updated my post to include file name. If you like it accept it :) –  Jotne Apr 15 at 10:33
    
The updated code doesn't print like my desired output. –  user3531678 Apr 15 at 11:18
    
@user3531678 You should be able to change File= to > like I have done on the post. –  Jotne Apr 15 at 11:32

You can try this perl script:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use v5.12;
use Text::Trim qw(trim);

my ($cur, $prev, $start); my $n=1; my $i=1;
while (<>) {
    trim $_;
    if ($.>1) { 
        $cur=$_;
        if ($cur==$prev+1) {
            $start=$prev if ($n==1);
            $n++;
        } else {
            if ($n>=3) {
                say "Range $i: $start-$prev";
                $i++;
            }
            $n=1;
        }
    }
    $prev=$cur;
}

Run it from the command line as ./test.pl file where file is your sample file.

For sample input file:

31
35
36
37
38
39    
44
169
170
173
174
175
177
206 
39
40
41
42
146
149
151

The output is:

Range 1: 35-39
Range 2: 173-175
Range 3: 39-42
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