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I need some help on my code below. I wanted to get the earliest time from the "Inspection Start" column and the get the latest time from the "Inspection Stop" column . The issue is my script does not seem to correctly pick up the earliest time. Or is it possible to compare timegm format using the script below

My data:

                Inspection Start      Inspection Stop

E4855 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:00:09_AM 3/12/2014_5:02:08_AM 9334 8195 8135 59 1 60 99.27 
H0096 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:22:58_AM 3/12/2014_5:24:55_AM 9334 8197 8138 58 1 59 99.28 
L0998 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:29:13_AM 3/12/2014_5:31:09_AM 9334 8163 8088 73 2 75 99.08 
P0113 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:15:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:17:39_AM 9334 8008 7927 80 1 81 98.99 
P0149 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:12:36_AM 3/12/2014_5:14:31_AM 9334 8195 8125 68 2 70 99.15 
T2765 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:25:59_AM 3/12/2014_5:28:00_AM 9334 7810 7732 77 1 78 99.00 
T5518 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:04:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:06:37_AM 9334 8182 8107 73 2 75 99.08 

my code:

#!/usr/bin/perl 

use Time::timegm; 

my $line = ""; 
my $ins_start_time =""; 
my $ins_end_time =""; 
my $tst_start_time =""; 
my $tst_start_time =""; 

open FH, "<file.txt" or die "could not open file, $!"; 

while($line=<FH>) { 
    chomp($line); 
    $line =~ s/\cM//g; 

    my @dummy = split /\s/, $line; 
    #print "$line\n"; 

    if ($dummy[0] =~ /^[A-Z]\d{0,4}$/i) { 
        ($dump, $dump, $st_dump, $et_dump, @dump) = @dummy; 

        ($mm, $dd, $yy, $hh, $min, $sec, $dump) = split /[\/\_\:]+/, $st_dump; 
        $ins_start_time = timegm($sec, $min, $hh, $dd, $mm-1, $yy); 
        print "$ins_start_time\t"; 

        if ($tst_start_time <= $ins_start_time) { 
            $tst_start_time = $ins_start_time; 
        } 

        ($mm, $dd, $yy, $hh, $min, $sec, $dump) = split /[\/\_\:]+/, $et_dump; 
        $ins_end_time = timegm($sec, $min, $hh, $dd, $mm-1, $yy); 
        print "$ins_end_time\n"; 

        if ($ins_end_time >= $tst_end_time) { 
            $tst_end_time = $ins_end_time; 
        } 
    } 
} 

close FH; 

print "Start Time =$tst_start_time\n"; 
print "Start Time =$tst_end_time\n"; 

OUTPUT: 

Start Time =1394602153 ##---->incorrect 

Start Time =1394602269 

EXPECTED OUTPUT: 

Start Time =1394600409 ##---->correct

Start Time =1394602269 
share|improve this question
    
You may want to take a look at DateTime::Format::Strptime for timestamp parsing. –  Lee Duhem Apr 14 at 12:04
    
Just try the Date::Manip module. Some examples are here: Date::Manip examples –  PseftiS Apr 14 at 12:52
    
Date::Manip is never the right answer :-) And, anyway, Time::Piece does everything you need here and is a standard part of the Perl distribution. –  Dave Cross Apr 14 at 13:33
    
Please indent your code in if and while loops when you post it. It makes it much easier to read and follow. –  David W. Apr 14 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

This might get a little easier if you use something like Time::Piece.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Time::Piece;

my $fmt = '%m/%d/%Y_%H:%M:%S_%p';

# Assumes that all of your data will be in the past
my $min_time = localtime;
my $max_time = localtime(0);

while (<DATA>) {
  my ($start_str, $stop_str) = (split)[2,3];
  my $start_time = Time::Piece->strptime($start_str, $fmt);
  my $stop_time  = Time::Piece->strptime($stop_str, $fmt);
  if ($start_time->epoch < $min_time->epoch) {
    $min_time = $start_time;
  }
  if ($stop_time->epoch > $max_time->epoch) {
    $max_time = $stop_time;
  }
}

say 'start - ', $min_time->strftime($fmt);
say 'stop  - ', $max_time->strftime($fmt);

__DATA__
E4855 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:00:09_AM 3/12/2014_5:02:08_AM 9334 8195 8135 59 1 60 99.27 
H0096 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:22:58_AM 3/12/2014_5:24:55_AM 9334 8197 8138 58 1 59 99.28 
L0998 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:29:13_AM 3/12/2014_5:31:09_AM 9334 8163 8088 73 2 75 99.08 
P0113 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:15:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:17:39_AM 9334 8008 7927 80 1 81 98.99 
P0149 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:12:36_AM 3/12/2014_5:14:31_AM 9334 8195 8125 68 2 70 99.15 
T2765 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:25:59_AM 3/12/2014_5:28:00_AM 9334 7810 7732 77 1 78 99.00 
T5518 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:04:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:06:37_AM 9334 8182 8107 73 2 75 99.08
share|improve this answer

Use Time::Local. This module imports the old timelocal and timegm functions and comes with Perl. Time:timegm also imports timegm, but Time::Local comes standard with Perl installations while Time::timegm does not.

Time::Local module imports two functions: timelocal and timegm. These two functions take time elements from a list and converts it to the number of seconds since the Epoch (which is usually January 1, 1970). These were meant to be inverse functions of the old localtime and gmtime functions that are built into the core Perl function set.

These four commands: timegm, gmtime, localtime, and timelocal are very, very old methods of handling dates in Perl. They come from Perl 3.x and convert back and forth between a list of time elements to the number of seconds since the epoch (which is usually, but not alway January 1, 1970).

As you can see, this is not the cleanest or easiest way of handling date and time. For example, the month number is between 0 and 11 and not 1 to 12, The hours are 24 hours, and the year is handled as the number of years since 1900. This means that 2014 is 114. You're suppose to add 1900 to the year.

Take a look at the two subroutines that convert the time back and forth and see the fun.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Time::Local;
use warnings;
use strict;
use feature qw(say);

my $earliest_start_time;
my $latest_stop_time;
while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    chomp $line;
    my @line_array = split /\s+/, $line;
    my $start_time = $line_array[2];
    my $stop_time   = $line_array[3];
    #
    # Here comes the fun!: We'll make a function for now...
    #
    my $start_epoch_time = convert_time_to_epoch( $start_time );
    my $stop_epoch_time  = convert_time_to_epoch ( $stop_time );
    if ( not defined $earliest_start_time or $start_epoch_time < $earliest_start_time ) {
        $earliest_start_time = $start_epoch_time;
    }
    if ( not defined $latest_stop_time or $stop_epoch_time > $latest_stop_time ) {
        $latest_stop_time = $stop_epoch_time;
    }
}

say 'The earliest time is ' . convert_time_from_epoch( $earliest_start_time );
say 'The latest time is ' . convert_time_from_epoch( $latest_stop_time );

#
# We hid the mess here
#
sub convert_time_to_epoch {
    my $time    = shift; # The time in report format

    #
    # First, we have to parse out the time pieces
    #
    if ( not $time =~ m{(\d+)/(\d+)/(\d+)_(\d+):(\d+):(\d+)_([AP]M)} ) {
        die qq(Invalid time format);
    }
    my $month   = $1;
    my $day     = $2;
    my $year    = $3;
    my $hour    = $4;
    my $minute  = $5;
    my $seconds = $6;
    my $meridian = $7;

    #
    # Now we have to normalize. Hours are 24 hours and month is from 0 - 11. Also year is 1900 + year
    #
    $month = $month - 1;
    $year  = $year - 1900;
    if ( $meridian eq "PM" ) {
        $hour = $hour + 12;
    }
    #
    # Finally, we can convert it to the number of seconds since the Epoch
    #
    return timelocal($seconds, $minute, $hour, $day, $month, $year);
}

sub convert_time_from_epoch {
    my $epoch_time = shift;

    my ( $seconds, $minute, $hour, $day, $month, $year ) = localtime $epoch_time;
    #
    # Normalize again. Month is from 0 to 11. Year adds 1900 to it.
    #
    $month += 1;
    $year += 1900;
    my $meridian;
    if ( $hour <= 12 ) {
        $meridian = "AM";
    }
    else {
        $hour -= 12;
        $meridian = "PM";
    }
    return sprintf "%d/%d/%d_%d:%02d:%02d_%s",
        $month, $day, $year, $hour, $minute, $seconds, $meridian
}

__DATA__
E4855 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:00:09_AM 3/12/2014_5:02:08_AM 9334 8195 8135 59 1 60 99.27 
H0096 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:22:58_AM 3/12/2014_5:24:55_AM 9334 8197 8138 58 1 59 99.28 
L0998 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:29:13_AM 3/12/2014_5:31:09_AM 9334 8163 8088 73 2 75 99.08 
P0113 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:15:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:17:39_AM 9334 8008 7927 80 1 81 98.99 
P0149 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:12:36_AM 3/12/2014_5:14:31_AM 9334 8195 8125 68 2 70 99.15 
T2765 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:25:59_AM 3/12/2014_5:28:00_AM 9334 7810 7732 77 1 78 99.00 
T5518 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:04:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:06:37_AM 9334 8182 8107 73 2 75 99.08

As others have pointed out, you should be using Time::Piece. Time::Piece comes standard with Perl, and is a less messy way of handling dates.

share|improve this answer

You're looking for the smallest value of $ins_start_time? Your problem is here:

if ($tst_start_time <= $ins_start_time) { ... }

You need:

if ($ins_start_time < $tst_start_time) { ... }

Also, you're ignoring AM/PM (which isn't a problem given your limited sample set, but could be a problem later), and are you sure the date format is mm/dd/yyyy, not dd/mm/yyyy?

EDIT: Although the above will solve your immediate problem, as others have suggested, there are more elegant and robust ways to solve this problem. I've built on Dave Cross' solution:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Time::Piece;
use List::Util 'max', 'min';

my $fmt = '%m/%d/%Y_%H:%M:%S_%p';

my @times = map Time::Piece->strptime($_, $fmt), map {(split)[2,3]} <DATA>;
say "start = " . min @times;
say "end = "   . max @times;

__DATA__
E4855 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:00:09_AM 3/12/2014_5:02:08_AM 9334 8195 8135 59 1 60 99.27 
H0096 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:22:58_AM 3/12/2014_5:24:55_AM 9334 8197 8138 58 1 59 99.28 
L0998 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:29:13_AM 3/12/2014_5:31:09_AM 9334 8163 8088 73 2 75 99.08 
P0113 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:15:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:17:39_AM 9334 8008 7927 80 1 81 98.99 
P0149 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:12:36_AM 3/12/2014_5:14:31_AM 9334 8195 8125 68 2 70 99.15 
T2765 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:25:59_AM 3/12/2014_5:28:00_AM 9334 7810 7732 77 1 78 99.00 
T5518 WI_LEFT01 3/12/2014_5:04:37_AM 3/12/2014_5:06:37_AM 9334 8182 8107 73 2 75 99.08
share|improve this answer
1  
m/d/yyyy is the American standard ("3/12/2014" means "February 12th, 2014"), and m/d/yyyy is far more likely than d/m/yyyy as it would mean the log entries were made a month ago rather than eight months into the future. –  ikegami Apr 14 at 13:55

You all seem to be correct. I also did some research and found this workaround or solution: I change my var declaration to this:

my $ins_start_time =0; 
my $ins_end_time =0; 
my $tst_start_time =0; 
my $tst_start_time =0x7fffffff;
.
.
.
if ($tst_start_time >= $ins_start_time)
{
     $tst_start_time = $ins_start_time;
}
.
.
.
share|improve this answer

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