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I have tried many ways to get the parent parameter to be visible to the reduce's callback function but I must be missing something...

// Static
var y = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].reduce(
    function(arr, x){
        arr.push(Math.pow(2, x));
        return arr},[]);
console.log(y);

// Dynamic
var lambda = function(arr, func) {
    return (function(f) { return arr.reduce(function(a, x) {
        a.push(f(x));
        return a;
    }, [])})(func);
}
var y = lambda([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7],function(x){return Math.pow(x);});
console.log(y);

Output:

[1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128]  
[NaN, NaN, NaN, NaN, NaN, NaN, NaN, NaN] 

DEMO @ JSFiddle

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closed as off-topic by VisioN, Bergi, thefourtheye, Mr. Polywhirl, Fabio Antunes Apr 15 at 9:26

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – VisioN, Bergi, thefourtheye, Mr. Polywhirl, Fabio Antunes
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What do you mean by parent parameter? –  thefourtheye Apr 14 at 11:52
    
I want to pass func to be visible to the reduce function. –  Mr. Polywhirl Apr 14 at 11:52
2  
Aren't you missing a 2 in Math.pow(x)? –  thefourtheye Apr 14 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are missing one of the parameters to Math.pow. You might wanna invoke the lambda like this

var y = lambda([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], function(x) {
    return Math.pow(2, x);
});

Also, you don't have to complicate the lambda construction with an IIFE. It can be simply

var lambda = function(arr, func) {
    return arr.reduce(function(a, x) {
        a.push(func(x));
        return a;
    }, []);
}

Edit: As you yourself suggested in the comments you can use Array.prototype.map, like this

console.log(arr.map(function(x) {
    return Math.pow(2, x);
}));
share|improve this answer
    
Although you answered second, you responded first. I will accept your answer but I will delete this post because it was a syntax error. –  Mr. Polywhirl Apr 14 at 12:08
1  
@Mr.Polywhirl: You shouldn't delete it, but we might close it. –  Bergi Apr 14 at 12:27
    
OK, I will vote to close my own question ;-p –  Mr. Polywhirl Apr 14 at 12:34
    
I just realized that I wrote an Array.map() function... –  Mr. Polywhirl Apr 14 at 14:33
    
@Mr.Polywhirl lol, even I realize that now... :) Included that also in the answer. –  thefourtheye Apr 14 at 14:34

Don't forget about the first argument in Math.pow:

// ------------------------------------------------------------v
lambda([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], function(x) { return Math.pow(2, x); });
share|improve this answer
    
"Welcome to Whose Code is it Anyway, the site where syntax is screwed up and the points don't matter" –  Mr. Polywhirl Apr 14 at 12:09

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