Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two threads that want to synchonize on the same object. Thead A needs to be able to interrupt Thread B if a certain condition has been fullfilled. Here is some pseudo-code of what the two threads do/should do.

A:

public void run()
{
    while(true)
    {
        //Do stuff
        synchronized(shared)
        {
            //Do more stuff
            if(condition)
            {
                B.interrupt();
            }
        }
    }
}

B:

public void run()
{
    while(true)
    {
        try
        {
            //Do stuff
            synchronized(shared)
            {
            //Do more stuff
            }
        }
        catch(InterruptedException e)
        {
            continue;
        }
    }
}

Here's the situation I can't resolve. Thread A grabs the shared resource and does some stuff. Meanwhile, Thread B reaches the synchronized block, and awaits for A to release its shared resource. Thread A, while doing stuff, realized that Thread B should not have the shared resource, and tries to interrupt Thread B. But Thread B has already surpassed the points where an InteruptedException could be thrown.

My question is, is there any way to interrupt a thread while it is waiting to be synchronized on something?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For this kind of thing, you should use the classes in java.util.concurrent.locks - they have far more capabilities, including interruptable locks.

Edit: If you cannot use those classes, then look at jkff's answer - your requirements can be met with the wait()/notify() mechnism, but it's easy to introduce subtle bugs.

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid that that might be the solution: I'm working with a subset of Java, which doesn't have those classes by default. Are they pure Java (in which case I could include them anyway), or do they require native libraries (a no-go)? –  Eric Feb 21 '10 at 14:07
    
It's pure Java, introduced in Java 1.5 –  Valentin Rocher Feb 21 '10 at 14:08
    
@Eric, what subset? Is it j2me? –  finnw Feb 21 '10 at 14:57
    
@Valentin: I wouldn't be 100% certain about that. It might be true for the locks, but the java.util.concurrent.atomic classes definitely use native stuff (though they're specified in a way that they can be implemented less efficiently in pure Java, the JDK source code uses native calls). –  Michael Borgwardt Feb 21 '10 at 15:04
    
@finnw: No. I'm using LeJOS NXJ, a Java language for the Lego Mindstorms NXT Microcontroller. –  Eric Feb 21 '10 at 16:25
show 1 more comment

Indeed you should use the locks or implement your stuff with the Object.wait(), Object.notify() and Object.notifyAll() methods (locks are actually implemented with them). Do not forget to handle the so-called 'spurious wakeups' (wait() may return even if noone called notify() or notifyAll(), so it should always be called in a loop that checks that the condition you're waiting for is satisfied).

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, but ReentrantLock.lockInterruptibly() behaves similarly to the primitive monitorenter instruction and can be interrupted.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.