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In his blog post, Eric Lippert says that:

I note that on x86-based hardware this particular reordering of writes is actually never observed; those CPUs do not perform this optimization.

Does this mean that x86 CPUs do not have any of the issues that are talked about when discussing volatility and reordering of reads and writes, or does he mean that only in this example the CPU won't reorder?

What types of reorderings can happen in an x86_64 CPU and under which circumstances?

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Use the Intel Processor manuals for this. Memory ordering rules are described in Volume 3A, chapter 8.2.2 –  Hans Passant Apr 14 at 15:39
    
I meant what I said: the x86 does not reorder two writes with respect to each other. However it does reorder reads with respect to writes; reads can logically move backwards in time or writes logically forwards in time. Imagine you have main memory, and you have a copy of main memory on the chip. If you pre-fetch a page from main memory onto the chip to get one byte, that is effectively reading all of that page early; if you then get another byte from that page, it is already copied. If you write to the copy, that write might get flushed out later, delaying the write. –  Eric Lippert Apr 14 at 18:32
    
You should also read the follow-up article to that article: blog.coverity.com/2014/03/26/reordering-optimizations –  Eric Lippert Apr 14 at 18:33

1 Answer 1

Does this mean that x86 CPUs do not have any of the issues that are talked about when discussing volatility and reordering of reads and writes, or does he mean that only in this example the CPU won't reorder?

It means that stores are not rearranged in x86 CPUs; loads can still be moved backward through. Then, it is important to understand what x86 means. In the context of this post, it means only x86 and not its derivatives. The x86 oostore architecture enables far more memory reordering than the basic x86 implementation. You can get all the details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_ordering

There are plenty of examples around for this use case like the following:

Also, reordering cannot cross method call boundaries on this architecture.

Aside from reordering, just about any CPU architecture can cache values which is a far more visible optimization. Here is a good use case for this optimization:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/389730/The-unsung-hero-Volatile-keyword-Csharp-threading

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Do you have evidence that reordering does not cross calls? I am researching this topic, but was unable to confirm this. –  Miguel Angelo Nov 3 at 19:52
    
If I remember correctly, Ivan Godard, a high profile CPU architect, mentioned it in a talk about Prediction on the Mill CPU. I unfortunately do not have the time to double check right now. Here's the link anyway: millcomputing.com/docs/prediction –  Etienne Maheu Nov 4 at 13:53

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