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I have the following type:

data NestedList a = Elem a | List [NestedList a]

I'm trying to write a function that returns the most nested list within a given list, but I don't know where to start. Any help appreciated!

Example:

input of function is something like:

(List [List [List [List [Elem 1, Elem 2, Elem 3], Elem 5, Elem 6], List [Elem 5, Elem 6]], List [Elem 5, Elem 6]])

desired output of function:

(List [Elem 1, Elem 2, Elem 3])
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1  
Could you give some examples to make your question clearer? –  Lee Duhem Apr 14 at 15:30
4  
maybe it helps to change the point of view and think in terms of trees with height and/or depth –  epsilonhalbe Apr 14 at 15:42
1  
I've added an example of what I mean... –  Pajac Apr 14 at 15:43
    
@Pajac Cannot show it, maybe it is OK. But why [1, 2, 3]? Why not 1, 2, or 3? And by the way, this is not a value constructed by your value constructors Elem and List. –  Lee Duhem Apr 14 at 15:59
    
He means that the your example does not type check, it should technically be (List [List [etc etc etc]]) –  rafalio Apr 14 at 15:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll give an example using binary trees instead, which are very similar to your structure. You'll have the exercise of converting it to work with your data type.

Say I have a binary tree

data Tree a
    = Leaf a
    | Node (Tree a) (Tree a)
    deriving (Eq, Show)

and I want to find the values that have the maximum depth (there can be more than one!). How I would solve this would be to traverse down each branch recursively, recording the depth as I go, and then return back the value(s) at the bottom along with their depth.

First, I'll define my function structure

import Data.List (sortBy, groupBy)
import Data.Ord (comparing)
import Data.Function (on)


getDeepest :: Tree a -> [a]
getDeepest tree
    = map fst                        -- Strip the depth from the values
    . head                           -- Get just the ones with the largest depth
    . groupBy ((==) `on` snd)        -- Group by the depth
    . sortBy (flip (comparing snd))  -- Reverse sort by the depth (largest first)
    $ go tree 0                      -- Find all the "bottom" nodes
    where
        go :: Tree a -> Int -> [(a, Int)]
        go (Leaf a)   n = undefined
        go (Node l r) n = undefined

This is a common recursion format you'll see in Haskell. I have a local helper function that carries an additional value that I want to initialize at a particular value, in this case the depth 0. I've already included the logic that I know I want in order to get the output in a nice format. The flip (comparing snd) will do a reverse sort, so the largest depth will come first. We then group by the depth, extract the first group, then strip the depth from the values.

Now we just have to define what go does. We know that when we hit the bottom, we want to add the value to our accumulator with the depth that we found, so

go (Leaf a)   n = [(a, n)]

That case is pretty easy, we just make a tuple from the value and the depth and wrap it as a list. For the other case, we want to traverse down each branch, find the deepest elements, and return the deepest from both branches

go (Node l r) n = go l (n + 1) ++ go r (n + 1)

This is where the recursion happens. While this is certainly not the most efficient algorithm (Haskell lists aren't great for this, but we'll use them for simplicity), it is pretty simple still. All we do is go down each side and increase our depth by 1. So the whole algorithm together:

getDeepest :: Tree a -> [a]
getDeepest tree
    = map fst                        -- Strip the depth from the values
    . head                           -- Get just the ones with the largest depth
    . groupBy ((==) `on` snd)        -- Group by the depth
    . sortBy (flip (comparing snd))  -- Reverse sort by the depth (largest first)
    $ go tree 0                      -- Find all the "bottom" nodes
    where
        go :: Tree a -> Int -> [(a, Int)]
        go (Leaf a)   n = [(a, n)]
        go (Node l r) n = go l (n + 1) ++ go r (n + 1)

So as an example:

myTree :: Tree Int
myTree =
    Node
        (Node
            (Leaf 1)
            (Node
                (Leaf 2)
                (Leaf 3)))
        (Leaf 4)

Which can be visualized as

                Node
               /    \
            Node    Leaf 4
           /    \
       Leaf 1    Node
                /    \
            Leaf 2   Leaf 3

Then by applying getDeepest to it returns [2, 3]. I encourage you to drop the type signature from getDeepest and try deleting the various functions before go tree 0 (starting at the top) so that you can see what it looks like at each step, it should help you visualize the algorithm a bit better.

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Not OP, but this is a good explanation! There is an issue though, if we have two or more "Leaf levels" all at the same level. Then, instead of returning both of them, this function returns them flattened together and you can't discern what came from where. Not sure how to solve this myself, does one need some kind of way to pattern match on the value constructors, and, in OPs case, ensure that a NestedList is a List that contains things only made up with Elem? –  rafalio Apr 14 at 16:22
    
@radicality First of all, thanks for the edit, I had meant to put that import in (I think I actually hit undo too many times at some point). Secondly, OP asked for the "most nested list", which means that it by definition can only contain Elem values. This is similar to my algorithm, where the bottom level can only be Leaf values. Yes, you lose the information of where this comes from, although it would be easy to modify it to return a tuple of the deepest values and their depth in one go (fmap head . unzip instead of map fst), but OP didn't ask for that so I didn't include it. –  bheklilr Apr 14 at 16:30
    
@bheklir Not sure I understand. Say I have Node (Node (Leaf 1) (Node (Leaf 2) (Leaf 3))) (Node (Leaf 4) (Node (Leaf 5) (Leaf 6))) . Then (let's say we are interpreting this for the case of nested lists), I would want the answer to be either [2,3], or [5,6], or [[2,3],[5,6]], but this solution would just merge it together and return [2,3,5,6], so in the case of nested lists, we would get a wrong answer with this approach, no? –  rafalio Apr 14 at 16:39
    
@radicality I would suggest that OP's algorithm have type NestedList a -> [[a]], since it should find each of the deepest lists. All of mine are merged together because each leaf is a single value. You could instead think of the difference between Tree a and Tree [a], in the latter case the return type would be [[a]], where each element was a leaf in the original tree. –  bheklilr Apr 14 at 16:46

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