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I have a simple Python code to run Gevent.

Tested with Apache Benchmark with 10000 users and 5 concurrent but it's damn slow..nearly 2 seconds per request (1.419 ms) which is bad..

My code is

from gevent import wsgi, monkey

class WebServer(object): 
    def application(self, environ, start_response):
        start_response("200 OK", []) 
        return ["Hello world!"]

if __name__ == "__main__":
    monkey.patch_all()
    app = WebServer()
    wsgi.WSGIServer(('', 8888), app.application, log=None).serve_forever()

and the results are pretty horrible

Server Software:        
Server Hostname:        127.0.0.1
Server Port:            8888

Document Path:          /
Document Length:        12 bytes

Concurrency Level:      5
Time taken for tests:   28.379 seconds
Complete requests:      100000
Failed requests:        0
Write errors:           0
Total transferred:      10700000 bytes
HTML transferred:       1200000 bytes
Requests per second:    3523.73 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       1.419 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       0.284 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          368.20 [Kbytes/sec] received

Connection Times (ms)
              min  mean[+/-sd] median   max
Connect:        0    0   0.0      0       4
Processing:     0    1   0.1      1      10
Waiting:        0    1   0.1      1      10
Total:          0    1   0.1      1      10

Percentage of the requests served within a certain time (ms)
  50%      1
  66%      1
  75%      1
  80%      1
  90%      1
  95%      1
  98%      2
  99%      2
 100%     10 (longest request)

why is that?? this guy got way better results than mine, with the same code http://blindvic.blogspot.it/2013/04/hello-world-gevent-vs-nodejs.html

Tell me if I'm missing something here..

I searched to see if there are any tuning to do but can't find anything.

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1 Answer 1

Americans use "." as the decimal point, not as a separator between thousands and hundreds. "1.419" is more than 1 and less than 2, not over 1,000.

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1  
thank you for the reply Sam :) I got it now hehe that's embarassing as a developer...so that's roughly 2 milliseconds right? –  boy Apr 14 at 16:50
1  
now that this thing is clear to me..how did that guy manage to have 5 times the request time I got, having the same code? –  boy Apr 14 at 16:52
    
@boy Your results are 2-3 times lower than in that post. It depends on your machine. –  warvariuc May 19 at 5:38

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