Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm been ask to do a Jacobian in MatLab to solve the coordinates for the highest value for f(x) and also the max value for the same function.

The function I have to work with is : f(x; y) = (x^3y + 5x^2y^2)/ e^(x^2+3y^4)

so what I have accomplished so far:

function [j1,j2]=J(x)    
    [3*x(1)^2+20*x(1)*x(2)-36*x(1)^2*x(2)^4-120*x(1)*x(2)^5,10*x(1)^2-48*x(1)^3*x(2)^3-300*x(1)^2*x(2)^4;6*x(1)*x(2)+10*x(2)^2-8*x(1)^3*x(2)-30*x(1)^2*x(2)^2,3*x(1)^2+20*x(1)*x(2)-2*x(1)^4-20*x(1)^3*x(2)]     
end

I believe this is an matrix including all four derivatives of f(x). Nut now I don't know how to solve my two questions.

share|improve this question
    
i´ve tried to write max(J([x,y])) in command window, but got wrong kordinates.... – user3532582 Apr 14 '14 at 15:44
    
and what an exact question would be? – Kamiccolo Apr 14 '14 at 15:57
    
How can I use my function to get the kordinates of the highest values of f(x,y) and how do i get the maxvalue of the given function? – user3532582 Apr 14 '14 at 16:06
    
Tanks for responding. – user3532582 Apr 14 '14 at 16:08
    
Anyone? please help, Im really stuck – user3532582 Apr 14 '14 at 17:19

The answer was already given in the comments, to make sure the question will not remain unanswerd I will post it here:

First i wrote the jocobian matris as

function A = J(x) j11 = 6*x(1)*x(2)+10*x(2)^2-8*x(1)^3*x(2)-30*x(1)^2*x(2)^2; 
j12 = 3*x(1)^2+20*x(1)*x(2)-2*x(1)^4-20*x(1)^3*x(2); 
j21 = 3*x(1)^2+20*x(1)*x(2)-36*x(1)^2*x(2)^4-120*x(1)*x(2)^5; 
j22 = 10*x(1)^2-48*x(1)^3*x(2)^3-300*x(1)^2*x(2)^4; A = [j11, j12;j21, j22]; 
end 

Then i used this function to estimate criticalpoints

function xnp1 = NewtonMultyVar(x0,N); 
xn = x0; 
  for n = 1:N 
    xnp1 = xn - inv(J(xn))*z(xn); 
    xn = xnp1; 
end 
end 

Where x0 is youre approximated point and N stands for number notations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.