Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a schema and user called "WebAPI" which is used by ASP.NET project to get stock levels.

So, I have simple stored procedure:

SELECT p.ProductCode,
        SUM( sl.Qty ) AS 'Qty'
FROM dbo.StockLevel sl
INNER JOIN dbo.Product p ON p.ProductID = sl.ProductID
GROUP BY p.ProductCode

I have executed this fine under SSMS using "WebApi" user which works fine.

But executing this within ASP.NET I get error message of:

The SELECT permission was denied on the column 'ProductID' of the object 'Product", database 'TestingDb', schema 'dbo'.

Here is the code I'm using in ASP.NET:

    string connectionString = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["ConnectionString"]; 

    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
        using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            conn.Open();
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.CommandText = "[webapi].[GetStock]";

            using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                if (reader.Read())
                {
                    var objTmp = new StockReportEntity();
                    objTmp.ProductCode = (string)reader["ProductCode"];
                    objTmp.Qty = (decimal) reader["Qty"];
                    objRet.Add(objTmp);

                }
            }
        }
    }

I know I could just grant read access on ProductID column to fix this but I'm wondering why SSMS is allowed to execute the stored procedure but ASP.NET isn't.

I thought granting execute on the stored procedure would be enough so I don't have to expose any table information explicitly.

share|improve this question

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Apr 14 at 15:52

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

1  
Run SQL Server Profiler and find out what is really happening. –  JeffO Apr 14 at 12:53
    
@JeffO I've ran a profiler and all I get is: exec sp_reset_connection exec [webapi].[GetStock] thats why it's so strange. Thanks for your suggestion. –  Paul Apr 14 at 14:06
    
We don't know which login was used with ASP.NET. With same logins, the behaviour should be the same. It could get difficult to access data between schemas if the user is not granted access to the schema. You could sign the procedure, see here for an example: stackoverflow.com/questions/22796785/… –  dean Apr 14 at 18:56
    
@dean Excellent, certificate did the job. If you post that I will mark as answer. Cheers. –  Paul Apr 14 at 22:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you need is to sign the procedure.

First, the setup:

use Test
go
if exists (select * from sys.syslogins where name = 'UserA')
    drop login UserA 
create login UserA with password = 'Welcome'
if exists (select * from sys.syslogins where name = 'UserB')
    drop login UserB 
create login UserB with password = 'Welcome'
if exists (select * from sys.syslogins where name = 'UserC')
    drop login UserC 
create login UserC with password = 'Welcome'

if exists (select * from sys.tables where name = 'Customers' and schema_name(schema_id) = 'SchemaA')
    drop table SchemaA.Customers
if exists (select * from sys.schemas where name = 'SchemaA')
    drop schema SchemaA
if exists (select * from sys.sysusers where name = 'UserA')
    drop user UserA

if exists (select * from sys.tables where name = 'Orders' and schema_name(schema_id) = 'SchemaB')
    drop table SchemaB.Orders
if exists (select * from sys.procedures where name = 'GetCustomerOrderInfo' and schema_name(schema_id) = 'SchemaB')
    drop procedure SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo 
if exists (select * from sys.schemas where name = 'SchemaB')
    drop schema SchemaB
if exists (select * from sys.sysusers where name = 'UserB')
    drop user UserB

if exists (select * from sys.sysusers where name = 'UserC')
    drop user UserC

create user UserA for login UserA
alter role db_owner add member UserA
go
create schema SchemaA authorization UserA
go
create user UserB for login UserB
alter role db_owner add member UserB
go
create schema SchemaB authorization UserB
go
create user UserC for login UserC

create table SchemaA.Customers (id int identity)

create table SchemaB.Orders (id int identity, CustomerId int)
go
create procedure SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo 
as
select  *
from    SchemaB.Orders o
join    SchemaA.Customers c
on      c.id = o.CustomerId
go

We want UserC to be able to execute the SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo procedure. Let's give the UserC execute permission on the procedure:

grant execute on SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo to UserC
execute as login = 'UserC'
exec SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo 
-- The SELECT permission was denied on the object 'Customers', database 'Test', schema 'SchemaA'.
revert

This wasn't good enough. What we can do is create a certificate in the database, a database user on this certificate, give that user appropriate permissions (db_owner role in this sample), and then sign the procedure with the certificate:

create certificate cert_raiser
    encryption by password = 'pGFD4bb925DGvbd2439587y'
    with subject = 'raiser', 
    expiry_date = '01/01/2114';
go

create user cert_user from certificate cert_raiser
go

alter role db_owner add member cert_user
go

add signature to SchemaB.GetCustomerOrderInfo 
   by certificate cert_raiser
    with password = 'pGFD4bb925DGvbd2439587y';
go

It should work OK now.

Points to make: the user created on the certificate cannot be used as a normal user, there is no login with it and it's not a security problem; all the permissions we give that user will be added to context in which the procedure is executed when we add a signature; If we alter the procedure, we have to sign it again.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.