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I am nerd in javascript prototypal inheritance.I can able understand what happening in below code

function Hamster() {  }
Hamster.prototype = {
  food: [],
  found: function(something) {
    this.food.push(something)
  }
}

// Create two speedy and lazy hamsters, then feed the first one
speedy = new Hamster()
lazy = new Hamster()

speedy.found("apple")
speedy.found("orange")

alert(speedy.food.length) // 2

And below line is also alert 2 b'coz both object is sharing food array from Hamster's prototype

alert(lazy.food.length) // 2

But if i change datatype of array into number , food key is not sharing between both instances

function Hamster() {  }
Hamster.prototype = {
  food: 0,
  found: function(something) {
    this.food = something
  }
}

// Create two speedy and lazy hamsters, then feed the first one
speedy = new Hamster()
lazy = new Hamster()

speedy.found(123)


alert(speedy.food) // 123

But the below line alerts 0 , Could you please tell me why this doesn't alert 123

alert(lazy.food) // 0
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Each instance of Hamster has its own food property. But in the first version, they all point to the same array, which you're modifying in place with push. In the second version, they point to integers, which can't be modified in place; the found function reassigns that instance's property, which has no effect on other instances.

To give each instance its own food array property, you need to use a constructor that assigns it.

You can see similar behavior with the following, which just uses ordinary variables rather than objects and inheritance.

arr1 = [];
arr2 = arr1;
arr1.push(1);
console.log(arr2); // prints [1]

int1 = 0;
int2 = int1;
int1 = 1;
console.log(int2); // prints 0

Assigning operator '=' removes the pointer from variable

arr1 = [];
arr2 = arr1;
arr2 = ['Appple'];
console.log(arr1); // prints []
share|improve this answer
    
I just modified the found function found: function(something) { this.food += something } Instead of re assigning it , still i am getting 0 for lazy's instance –  Vimal Apr 14 at 16:46
2  
That doesn't make a difference, this.food += is just shorthand for this.food = this.food + . Numbers can't be modified in place, they aren't composite objects like arrays and objects. –  Barmar Apr 14 at 16:47
    
The thing to understand is that in the first case both objects still have their own value for food; it's just that their value in each case is a reference to the same object in memory. –  lwburk Apr 14 at 16:48
    
Right, @Vimalraj.S because each object gets its own food in both the first case and the second case. –  lwburk Apr 14 at 16:49
1  
array.push does not create a new reference. That's the whole point. Both objects have a food property that references the same array in memory, so when you push an element onto that array (through either reference), you're still always updating the same array. –  lwburk Apr 14 at 18:13

In JavaScript, attributes lookups follow Prototype chain, but not attribute assignments.

So, when you say

this.food = something;

food attribute is created on the object. So, it overrides the food from the prototype. But when you access lazy, since it is attribute lookup, first the current object is searched and then the prototype, where it is defined and assigned value 0. That is why it alerts 0.

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1  
But it's not shared in the second version, that's his question. –  Barmar Apr 14 at 16:42
    
@Barmar I updated my answer. –  thefourtheye Apr 14 at 16:45

The thing to understand is that in the first case both objects still have their own value for food; it's just that their value in each case is a reference to the same object in memory, so pushing an item into the array referenced by that property changes the same array.

@Barmar's answer, which I upvoted, already said all that, but here's another example that should help demonstrate this:

function Hamster() {}

Hamster.prototype = {
    food: [],
    found: function(something) {
        this.food = something;
    }
}

// Create two speedy and lazy hamsters, then feed the first one
speedy = new Hamster()
lazy = new Hamster()

speedy.found(["apple"])
speedy.found(["orange"])

alert(speedy.food) // orange
alert(lazy.food) // <empty>

In this case, each food property gets a reference to a different array, so it's clear that each property is independent.

The key thing to take away:

The value of a variable that holds an object is a reference to that object. The value of a variable that holds a primitive (like a number) is the value of the primitive itself.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Vimal raj.S Your suggested edit completely undid the point of my example, which is to show that each new object gets its own food property in every case. I don't know how else this can be explained so that you'll get it. It may just take some time (or maybe someone else will answer in a way different from me and @Barmar that makes sense to you). Good luck! –  lwburk Apr 14 at 18:24
    
+1 because you made the effort to try to explain that. –  dystroy Apr 14 at 18:30
    
@lwburk, No, In your example speedy.found(["apple"]) doesn't make any sense here , because we are assigning the value in found function , so it will work same as speedy.found("apple") which uses a instance food variable. However your answer gives a better idea , and now my doubt is How Array.Push works with reference while assigning operator = cannot ? –  Vimal Apr 14 at 18:40
    
I think you've missed the entire point of my example. I'm sorry that it didn't help. –  lwburk Apr 14 at 18:42

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