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I am new in learning Sparql. I am wondering is there a way to query nodes with no direct relation between them suppose I have the following triples in RDF

book - created_by - Author

writer - work - company

company - location - location

can I write query in Sparql to find the location of the authors of given paper we have only the paper info and we would like the retrieve the location

without knowing the relation between writer - work - company

company - location - location

Update: I am wondering if sparql have a feature similar to // in xquery and xpath // Selects nodes in the document from the current node that match the selection no matter where they are

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2  
You'll need to clarify a bit more of what you're trying to do. Can you provide some sample input data (that's actually legal data that we can write SPARQL queries against)? It's easy enough to find out what authors are connected to what locations though an unknown chain of properties (although it may not be possible to find out what those properties were). We'll need some more input, though. –  Joshua Taylor Apr 14 at 18:30
    
I am wondering if sparql have a feature similar to // in xquery and xpath // Selects nodes in the document from the current node that match the selection no matter where they are –  user3533010 Apr 16 at 13:58
    
Sure, that's just a wildcard property path. The difficulty that you may encounter, though, is that RDF graphs are directed graphs, not (necessarily) trees, which means that a wildcard path may go farther than you expect. This means that, e.g., you can start at a paper and find locations reachable from it, but you don't have any guarantee that, e.g., the reachability indicates that it's the location of a company that employs the author. –  Joshua Taylor Apr 16 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Suppose you've got data like this (three books, three authors, two companies (two of the authors work at the same company), and two locations (one for each company)):

@prefix : <http://stackoverflow.com/q/23066695/1281433/>.

:book1 a :Book; :createdBy :author1 .
:book2 a :Book; :createdBy :author2 .
:book3 a :Book; :createdBy :author3 .

:author1 a :Author; :worksFor :company1. 
:author2 a :Author; :worksFor :company2. 
:author3 a :Author; :worksFor :company2. 

:company1 a :Company; :locatedIn :location1.
:company2 a :Company; :locatedIn :location2.

:location1 a :Location.
:location2 a :Location.

Then you can use a query like this to get the results that relate books to locations:

prefix : <http://stackoverflow.com/q/23066695/1281433/>

select ?book ?location where {
  ?book a :Book; (:|!:)* ?location .
  ?location a :Location .
}
-----------------------
| book   | location   |
=======================
| :book1 | :location1 |
| :book2 | :location2 |
| :book3 | :location2 |
-----------------------

The trick here is in using a property path that amounts to a wildcard. Every IRI is either : or it isn't, so the path :|!: matches every property. This means that the path (:|!:)* is a wildcard path. By requiring that ?book and ?location have types :Book and :Location, respectively, we've found paths from books to locations. See SPARQL: property paths without specified predicates and sparql complete tree from subject for more about property paths with wildcards.

There's a possible problem here, of course. RDF graphs are directed graphs, and anything can be related to anything else. This means that if you have a relation like :location2 :northOf :location1, then there's now a path from :book3 to :location1. That might not have been what you were expecting.

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perfect. This is what I am looking for –  user3533010 Apr 17 at 1:36

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