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I would like to use the R package plyr to run a pairwise t test on a really large data frame, but I'm not sure how to do it. I recently learned how to do correlations using plyr, and I really like how you can specify which groups you want to compare and then plyr breaks down the data for you. For example, you could have plyr calculate the correlation between sepal length and sepal width for each species of iris in the iris dataset like this:

Correlations <- ddply(iris, "Species", function(x) cor(x$Sepal.Length, x$Sepal.Width))

I could break the data frame down myself by specifying that the data for the setosa species of iris are in rows 1:50 and so on, but plyr would be less likely than me to mess up and accidentally say rows 1:51, for example.

So how do I do something similar with a paired t test? How can I specify which observations are the pairs? Here's some example data that are similar to what I'm working with, and I'd like the pairs to be the Subject and I'd like to break the data down by Pesticide:

 Exposure <- data.frame("Subject" = rep(1:4, 6), 
                     "Season" = rep(c(rep("summer", 4), rep("winter", 4)),3),
                     "Pesticide" = rep(c("atrazine", "metolachlor", "chlorpyrifos"), each=8),
                      "Exposure" = sample(1:100, size=24))
 Exposure$Subject <- as.factor(Exposure$Subject)

In other words, the question I'd like to evaluate is whether there is a difference in pesticide exposure for each person during the winter versus during the summer, and I'd like to answer that question separately for each of the three pesticides.

Much thanks in advance!

An edit: To clarify, this is how to do an unpaired t test in plyr:

 TTests <- dlply(Exposure, "Pesticide", function(x) t.test(x$Exposure ~ x$Season))

And if I add "paired=T" in there, plyr will do a paired t test, but it assumes that I always have the pairs in the same order. While I do have them all in the same order in the example data frame above, I don't in my real data because I sometimes have missing data.

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2 Answers 2

Do you want this?

library(data.table)

# convert to data.table in place
setDT(Exposure)

# make sure data is sorted correctly
setkey(Exposure, Pesticide, Season, Subject)

Exposure[, list(res = list(t.test(Exposure[Season == "summer"],
                                  Exposure[Season == "winter"],
                                  paired = T)))
         , by = Pesticide]$res
#[[1]]
#
#        Paired t-test
#
#data:  Exposure[Season == "summer"] and Exposure[Season == "winter"]
#t = -4.1295, df = 3, p-value = 0.02576
#alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
#95 percent confidence interval:
# -31.871962  -4.128038
#sample estimates:
#mean of the differences 
#                    -18 
#
#
#[[2]]
#
#        Paired t-test
#
#data:  Exposure[Season == "summer"] and Exposure[Season == "winter"]
#t = -6.458, df = 3, p-value = 0.007532
#alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
#95 percent confidence interval:
# -73.89299 -25.10701
#sample estimates:
#mean of the differences 
#                  -49.5 
#
#
#[[3]]
#
#        Paired t-test
#
#data:  Exposure[Season == "summer"] and Exposure[Season == "winter"]
#t = -2.5162, df = 3, p-value = 0.08646
#alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
#95 percent confidence interval:
# -30.008282   3.508282
#sample estimates:
#mean of the differences 
#                 -13.25
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, @eddi; that gets me closer, but I still wonder about what to do with missing observations. For example, if I missed sampling subject 1 during the winter, even if I sorted the data appropriately, I'll get an error that "not all arguments are the same length". If I were to try doing something similar here with multivariate linear regression, something like this would work, even with missing data: "lm(Exposure ~ Season + Subject)" (not the best example in this case, but can't think of anything better). That would specify the subject. Maybe there isn't any corrolary to that with t tests. –  LauraS Apr 14 at 19:52
    
@LauraS here's one option - filter the data before you start doing the above: Exposure = Exposure[, if(.N == 2) .SD, by = list(Pesticide, Subject)] –  eddi Apr 14 at 19:54
    
Actually, that code didn't work for me; R tells me that the "by =..." part is unused. :-) –  LauraS Apr 14 at 19:58
    
@LauraS I think you forgot to convert to a data.table –  eddi Apr 14 at 19:59
    
And actually, I had a couple of other questions about the code in your answer: What are the commands "setkey" and "setDT"? Thank you very much for your help here! –  LauraS Apr 14 at 20:00

I don't know ddply, but here's how I would do using some base functions.

by(data = Exposure, INDICES = Exposure$Pesticide, FUN = function(x) {
  t.test(Exposure ~ Season, data = x)
})

Exposure$Pesticide: atrazine

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  Exposure by Season
t = -0.1468, df = 5.494, p-value = 0.8885
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
95 percent confidence interval:
 -49.63477  44.13477
sample estimates:
mean in group summer mean in group winter 
               60.50                63.25 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
Exposure$Pesticide: chlorpyrifos

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  Exposure by Season
t = -0.8932, df = 4.704, p-value = 0.4151
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
95 percent confidence interval:
 -83.58274  41.08274
sample estimates:
mean in group summer mean in group winter 
               52.25                73.50 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
Exposure$Pesticide: metolachlor

    Welch Two Sample t-test

data:  Exposure by Season
t = 0.8602, df = 5.561, p-value = 0.4252
alternative hypothesis: true difference in means is not equal to 0
95 percent confidence interval:
 -39.8993  81.8993
sample estimates:
mean in group summer mean in group winter 
                62.5                 41.5 
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... Thanks for the suggestion, @Roman Luštrik, but that doesn't address the issue with it being paired. –  LauraS Apr 14 at 18:40

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