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I'm trying to implement a working HTTP Client-Server application just to make practice with network programming.
The 2 programs have to follow this basic algorithm:
CLIENT - send a GET request
SERVER - send "+OK\r\n"
SERVER - send file size in bytes
SERVER - send file
CLIENT - send ACK

I'm having a lot of troubles in the reading part, probably because i perform some dirty read on the stream.

These are the 2 reading function that i'm using:

/* Reads a line from stream socket s to buffer ptr
The line is stored in ptr including the final '\n'
At most maxlen chasracters are read*/
int readline (SOCKET s, char *ptr, size_t maxlen)
{
    size_t n;
    ssize_t nread;
    char c;

    for (n=1; n<maxlen; n++)
    {
        nread=recv(s, &c, 1, 0);
        if (nread == 1)
        {
            *ptr++ = c;
            if (c == '\n')
                break;
        }
        else if (nread == 0)    /* connection closed by party */
        {
            *ptr = 0;
            return (n-1);
        }
        else            /* error */
            return (-1);
    }
    *ptr = 0;
    return (n);
}

and:

int readNumber(SOCKET s, long *num, int maxRead)
{
    size_t n;
    ssize_t nread;
    int totRead;
    long number=0;
    for (n=1; n<maxRead+1; n++)
    {
        nread=recv(s, &number, sizeof(number), 0);
        if (nread == sizeof(number))
        {
            totRead+=nread;
            *num = number;
        }
        else if (nread == 0)    /* connection closed by party */
        {
            *num = 0;
            return (n-1);
        }
        else            /* error */
        {
            printf("nread = %d\n", nread);
            return (-1);
        }
    }
    return (totRead);
}

this is the snippet of the main where i receive the +OK message and then the file size:

    memset(rbuf,0,sizeof(rbuf));     //rbuf is the buffer where is store the read
    printf("waiting for response...\n");
    result = readline(s, rbuf, sizeof(rbuf));  //reading function is above
    printf("Byte read(okMsg) = %d\n", result);
    if (result <= 0)  
    //ERROR MANAGEMENT
    {
         printf("Read error/Connection closed\n");  
         closesocket(s);
         SockCleanup();
         exit(1);
    }
    else
    {
        long fileLength=0;
        unsigned char *fBuf;
        //RECEIVE OK
        if(!strcmp(rbuf,"+OK\r\n"))
        {
            puts("+OK\n");
            //RECEIVE FILE LEN
            int nw = readNumber(s, &fileLength, 1);  //reading function is above
            printf("Byte read(fDim) = %d\n", nw);
            printf("File is %ld bytes long\n", fileLength);
            if(nw >0)
            {
                // RECEIVE FILE

            }
        }
    }

When i send the "+OK\r\n" string the server tells me that it sends 8 bytes, but when i read i find the '\0' char only after 6 bytes. By the way it reads correctly the message, but when i try to read the file size (that is a long) it gives me back a wrong number.
My opinion is that the stream buffer is dirty, and that i'm reading 2 bytes that are not part of the file size, but i'm not understanding why this happens.

Please ask me more info if i'm not clear enough.

SOLVED:
Thank you all for your answers!!! You put me in the right mindset to understand what was wrong.
Look like the problem was this declaration in the server:

char *okMsg = "+OK\r\n";

instead of

char okMsg[] = "+OK\r\n";

that lead me to an undefined behavior.

share|improve this question
    
You have to remember that TCP is a streaming protocol. That means that a call to recv may return with less than requested number of bytes. That's one reason your readNumber function may not work as expected. But the bigger reason is because you have undefined behavior in it, when you are using uninitialized local variables (totRead more specifically). – Joachim Pileborg Apr 14 '14 at 18:34
    
"+OK\r\n" is 5 bytes, not 8, so you might want to figure out why your server is giving you an erroneous report. – Chris Stratton Apr 14 '14 at 18:37
    
I've always believed that whenever i don't initialize a variable it is implicitly initialized to zero, can you make me an example of undefined behavior in my code please? – NLK511 Apr 14 '14 at 18:37
1  
Declare a local variable in a function and print it, that's all you have to do to verify the behavior. Global and static variables are zero initialized, but never normal local variables. – Joachim Pileborg Apr 14 '14 at 19:17
1  
I'd like to point out that your readline loop is very simple, but also probably the worst performing way to read data. You're calling recv for every character. That's a system call. A system call takes a lot of CPU cycles. The better way to do it is to use buffering and read the socket 4K or more at a time. – Zan Lynx Apr 14 '14 at 20:52
long number=0;
for (n=1; n<maxRead+1; n++)
{
    nread=recv(s, &number, sizeof(number), 0);

You forgot to design and implement a protocol to carry the data between your server and your client. Because TCP provides a stream of bytes, your protocol should be defined as a stream of bytes.

How many bytes convey this number? Is "however many bytes a 'long' happens to occupy on my platform" a good answer? What's the semantic meaning of the first byte? Is "whatever the first byte of a 'long' happens to mean on my platform" a good answer?

A good answer would be, "The size shall be conveyed as a 4-byte unsigned integer in little-endian byte order". Then make absolutely sure your code sends and receives in that format.

share|improve this answer

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