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Ok, so I'm obviously having some issues understanding how to work with hashes. Long story short, I'm attempting to parse through an ftp log and find the relevant flows for a specific search criteria. Basically what I'm trying to make it do is, say I have an IP address or a user name, it first does a pretty simple grep to try to minimize any data I don't need and send the output to an external file. If I'm searching for username testing1, then it does a grep on testing1 and sends the output to another file called output.txt:

Dec  2 00:14:09 ftp1 ftpd[743]: USER testing1
Dec  2 00:14:09 ftp1 ftpd[743]: FTP LOGIN FROM 192.168.0.2 [192.168.0.2], testing1
Dec  2 00:30:08 ftp1 ftpd[1261]: USER testing1
Dec  2 00:30:09 ftp1 ftpd[1261]: FTP LOGIN FROM 192.168.0.4 [192.168.0.4], testing1
Dec  2 01:12:33 ftp1 ftpd[11804]: USER testing1
Dec  2 01:12:33 ftp1 ftpd[11804]: FTP LOGIN FROM 192.168.0.2 [192.168.0.2], testing1

And below is an example of the originating log data:

Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: USER testing1
Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: PASS password  
Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: FTP LOGIN FROM 192.168.0.02 [192.168.0.2], testing1  
Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: PWD  
Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: CWD /test/data/  
Dec  1 23:59:03 ftp1 ftpd[4152]: TYPE Image

I then go in, put all the processIDs that I find along with the time of that ID and put them into a hash. Which is what you see below:

$VAR1 = {
      '743' => [
                 '00:1'
               ],
      '20687' => [
                   '01:3'
                 ],
      '27186' => [
                   '15:3'
                 ],
      '6929' => [
                  '12:0'
                ],
      '24771' => [
                   '09:0'
                 ],
      '11804' => [
                   '01:1'
                 ],
      '27683' => [
                   '08:3'
                 ],
      '14976' => [
                   '04:3'
                 ],
};

It looks as if the time is being put into the hash as an array. I was unable to figure out why this is happening to I decided to work with it as an array. The following is how the hash of arrays are created:

# -------------------------------------------------------
# Extract PIDs and Time from lines, take out doubles
# -------------------------------------------------------
my $infile3 = 'output.txt';
my %pids;
my $found;
my $var;

open (INPUT2, $infile3) or die "Couldn't read $infile3.\n";

while (my $line = <INPUT2>) {
    if($line =~ /(\d{2})\:(\d)/ ) {
        my $hhmm = $1 . ":" . $2;
        if ($line =~ /ftpd\[(.*?)\]/) {
            $found = 0;
            foreach $var(keys %pids){
                if(grep $1 =~ $var, keys %pids){
                    $found = 1;
                }
            }
            if ($found == 0){
                push @{$pids{$1}}, $hhmm;

            }
        }       
    }

}

To speed things up I have decided to read all the lines that have the matching PIDs, whether they fit the flow or not, into an array so I don't have to keep reading in the originating file.

##-------------------------------------------------------
## read each line from file into an array
##-------------------------------------------------------
open (INPUT, $infile2) or die "Couldn't read $infile2.\n";

my @messages;

while (my $line = <INPUT>){
    # if there is a match to the PID then put the line in the array
    if ($line =~ /ftpd\[(.*?)\]/){
        my $mPID = $1;
        foreach my $key (keys %pids){
            if ($key =~ $mPID){
                push @messages, $line;
            }
        }  
    }
}

I'm now trying to match the line up with the PID and the Time to get the flow. I'm only matching the hh:m in the time for more of a chance to get the entire flow and because chances of other flows with a PID having the same timeframe is pretty slim. Eventually all these results will be send to an internal web page.

# -------------------------------------------------------
#find flow based on PID that was found from criteria
#-------------------------------------------------------

foreach my $line(@messages){
    if(my($pid) = $line =~ m{ \[ \s*(\d+) \]: }x) {
        if($line =~ /(\d{2})\:(\d)/){
            my $time = $1 . ":" . $2;
            if ($pids{$pid}[0] =~ /$time/){
                 push $pids{$pid}[0], $line;
            }
        }
    }
}

Right now the above code for some reason is actually deleting the time from the hash once it is matched. I am unsure why this is happening.

I was able to get is working with a bash script but took decades for it to complete. Thanks to suggestions from people here I have decided to tackle it with Perl so am basically taking a crash course. I've read everything I can and have basic programming skills in C++ but obviously still need a lot of work. I also got it working using arrays but once again it was incredibly slow and i was getting a lot of flows that matched the process ID but were not the flows I was looking for. So after further suggestions I decided to work with hashes, have the process ID as the key, have a specific time referenced to that key, and then lines within the log that have both that key and time as the flow. I have had multiple questions on this already but have A. Not explained myself clearly and B. have been trying different things as I learn. But for the record everyone here has helped me tremendously and I hope that one day I can do the same for others on this list. For some reason I just can't get this stuff through my thick skull.

Anyways, hopefully I covered everything, I'm sure I'm starting to get on people's nerves with all these questions so I apologize.

UPDATE:

Well I think I figured out how to make it all hashes but doesn't look right. I changed push @{$pids{$1}}, $hhmm; to $pids{$1}{$x} = $hhmm; which creates the following:

$VAR1 = {
          '743' => {
                     '' => '00:1'
                   },
          '20687' => {
                       '' => '01:3'
        },

But it doesn't look like it's referencing correctly so when I do print $pids{743}; all it prints is HASH(0x4caf10)

UPDATE:

Ok, I was able to put all the values into hashes by changing @{$pids{$1}}, $hhmm; to $pids{$1} = $hhmm; which seems to be working:

$VAR1 = {
          '743' => '00:1',
          '20687' => '01:3',
};

But now how do I check to see if the value '00:1' matches another variable? This is what I currently have and is not working:

if($pids{$pid} == qr/$time/){
    $pids{$pid}{$time}[$y] = $line;
    $y++;
};

This is how it should look after the match is made:

$VAR1 = {
          '743' => '00:1',
          '4771' => {
                      '23:5' => [
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: USER test
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: PASS password
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: FTP LOGIN FROM 192.168.0.2 [192.168.0.2], test
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: CWD /home/test/
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: TYPE Image
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: PASV
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: RETR test
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: QUIT
',
                                  'Dec  1 23:59:23 ftp1 ftpd[4771]: FTP session closed
'
                                ]
                    },
share|improve this question
    
@amon answered this for me at stackoverflow.com/questions/23115025/… –  cycloxr Apr 17 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

You have a couple of errors in your code.

The first is that you're only pulling out one digit of the minutes:

    if($line =~ /(\d{2})\:(\d)/ ) {

should be

    if($line =~ /(\d{2})\:(\d{2})/ ) {

If I'm interpreting the intent of your code correctly, you're trying to find out whether you've already seen a time for a given pid so that you only set it the first time. If so, you don't need to loop through all the keys in %pid to do this. All you really need to do is

        if ($line =~ /ftpd\[(.*?)\]/) {
            $pid{$1}[0] = $hhmm unless exists $pid{$1};
        }

Notice that I'm doing an assignment rather than a push, so I will wind up with the time in the first element of the array reference.

I think you may have meant to type "==" instead of "=~" below:

            if(grep $1 =~ $var, keys %pids){

Presumably you need to capture more information than just the time, such as the user name, transfer type, etc. so you may find it better to use a hash reference instead of an array reference under the pid. That way you can tag and easily find your information:

        my $pid = $1;
        if ($line =~ /ftpd\[(.*?)\]/) {
            $pid{$pid}{time} = $hhmm unless exists $pid{$pid};
        }
        if ($line =~ /USER (\w+)/) {
            $pid{$pid}{user} = $1;
        }

Of course, you'll want to index according to whatever makes most sense for your purposes to make your searches fast. For instance, you might keep a second hash indexed by time:

           $time{$hhmm}{pid} = $pid;

or even keep a list of all the pids associated with a given user

           push @{$user{$1}}, $pid;
share|improve this answer
    
Hell Mark, thank you. I'm actually using the time as a time reference of the flow so I know if the flow belongs with that criteria I'm searching for. –  cycloxr Apr 15 at 2:38

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