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To start this is a homework question:

The goal of this project is to implement a double linked-list for a void * data type.

I am given a .h file with the following struct definition:

//dlList.h
#ifndef _DLLIST_ADT_H_
#define _DLLIST_ADT_H_

#include <stdbool.h>

#ifndef _DLL_IMPL_

/// DlList_T points to a representation of a double-linked list 
/// of void pointers (to abstract data objects).
typedef struct { } * DlList_T;

#endif

//Function declarations below

#endif

and in my dlList.c file I am attempting to do something like this:

//dlList.c

typedef struct _dlNode{

    struct _dlNode *prev;
    struct _dlNode *next;
    void * data; //pointer to a memory address

} dlNode;

struct _DlList_T{

    struct _dlNode *start; //the first item in the list
    struct _dlNode *cursor; //the current item the list is pointing to
    int curIndex; //index of current item
    int maxIndex; //number of items in list


} * DlList_T;

//Rest of .c file 

All my errors have to do with variations of

Conflicting types for 'DlList_T'

I've tried several variations of the struct in the .c file, but I think I'm missing something quite obvious...

Should I just take my DlList_T struct in my .c file, rename it to something else and then just cast it whenever I need it...?

As another note I am NOT allowed to change the .h file in any way. When I submit the project a local copy of the .h file will be used by try.

I'm quite lost and any help will be appreciated, thanks!

Edit: Included the #ifndef and #endif's for the header file

Edit 2: This is compiled with gcc using the -std=c99 flag.

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Are you required to define DlList_T in your .c file? (Are you required to use the DlList_T structure from the .h file at all?) –  Mahonri Moriancumer Apr 14 '14 at 19:03
4  
An empty struct is illegal in standard C. (Some compilers may or may not support it as an extension.) –  Keith Thompson Apr 14 '14 at 19:05
    
@Mahonri Not sure, I believe so though. An example function from the header file is void dll_clear( DlList_T lst ); so I assume it has to have some declaration. I also edited my original question to contain the #ifndef and #endif tags. –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:06
    
@Keith we are using the standard gnu c compiler if that makes a difference. –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:08
1  
gcc doesn't strictly follow the standard unless you tell it to, with something like -std=c99 -pedantic. gcc happens to support empty structs as an extension, but I wouldn't advise depending on that unless you have a very good reason to do so. The comment talks about "a double-linked list of void pointers"; you probably need to have a void* member in your struct. –  Keith Thompson Apr 14 '14 at 19:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <dlList.h>

typedef struct _dlNode
   {
   struct _dlNode *prev;
   struct _dlNode *next;
   void * data; //pointer to a memory address
   } dlNode;

struct _MyList_T
   {
   struct _dlNode *start; //the first item in the list
   struct _dlNode *cursor; //the current item the list is pointing to
   int curIndex; //index of current item
   int maxIndex; //number of items in list
   } * MyList_T;

void dll_clear(DlList_T lst)
   {
   MyList_T list = (MyList_T)lst;

   list->cursor...

   return;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is working and what I believe to be the correct implementation. I'll double check with him tomorrow during class. As a side note instead of doing MyList_T list = (MyList_T*)lst; I had to break it into two lines and remove the * to remove the warning initialization from incompatable pointer type [enabled by default]. I think it's because lst is already a pointer and your version gives me a **...? –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:35
    
Oops... sorry. I had to make one correction. I had cast list value to (MyList_T *) when I should have cast it to (MyList). –  Mahonri Moriancumer Apr 14 '14 at 19:40
    
Ah, thanks. That pretty much fixes it :) –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:41
    
This code still has a line typedef struct { } * DlList_T; active. I don't know, you wouldn't be able to compile this in every compiler, it's like using the language C?? instead of C, non-standard, whatever... –  ThoAppelsin Apr 14 '14 at 19:46
    
@ThoAppelsin This is compiled using gcc with the -std=c99 flag. I know it's not true vanilla C but neither is a for loop. –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:50

Your first error is that DlList_T is a type in the .h file and a variable in the .c file. This can't work.

Second, you shouldn't have

typedef struct { } * DlList_T;

in the .h file but

typedef struct DlList * DlList_T;

or something similar. This is called a forward declaration (for two different names, struct DList and Dlist_T)

And then go for the declaration with {} of struct Dlist in your .c file. This is how hiding of the details of a type work in C. If your instructor has really given you a version with the {} in the header file, he or her should first revise basic C before teaching to others. (Empty struct is a constraint violation in C, but maybe accepted as an extension by gcc.)

share|improve this answer
    
I was given the .h file as described in my original question. I would link you directly to the .h file but it is behind a password on my universities servers. –  OmegaTwig Apr 14 '14 at 19:11
    
Then see the second part of my answer :( Sorry, but if this is so, your problem has no valid solution. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 14 '14 at 19:12
    
@OmegaTwig Then your instructor needs to learn C before attempting to teach it. Report this as a bug in the project assignment, and cite the C standard as an official and credile source. –  Filipe Gonçalves Apr 14 '14 at 19:16

You start with this statement

typedef struct { } * DlList_T;

Which typedefs and empty struct to the identifier of DlList_T.


Then, later on, this appears

struct _DlList_T{

    struct _dlNode *start; //the first item in the list
    struct _dlNode *cursor; //the current item the list is pointing to
    int curIndex; //index of current item
    int maxIndex; //number of items in list
} * DlList_T;

Which again typedefs something to the same identifier, DlList_T. This is illegal.

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I would advice to include the structure definition for a list node in the header file, but you can't modify it, you must place it in the .c source file.

Your error indicates that you have more than one definition for the type DlList_T: you can't say that DlList_T is a type alias for an empty struct (which you do in the header) and at the same type a pointer to struct _DlList_T (which you do in the source file).

So, first step: start by choosing another name for your list variable, for example, dbl_list:

struct _DlList_T {

    struct _dlNode *start; //the first item in the list
    struct _dlNode *cursor; //the current item the list is pointing to
    int curIndex; //index of current item
    int maxIndex; //number of items in list


} *dbl_list;

It is also a bad idea to define structures with leading _, since these are reserved for the implementation - consider choosing another name.

The header file should have this instead:

typedef struct DlList *DlList_T;

Or something similar (maybe with a different structure tag). The code you show is not standard C (empty structures are not standard), and it makes no sense. If this is what your instruction provided, I think you should report it as a bug. OR, make sure to go through the class exercises - maybe you are supposed to use a specific compiler with extensions that enable this kind of construct. But be forewarned that it is not portable.

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Following your latest update, consider making something as follows:

...

#define _DLL_IMPL_
// This is to prevent dlList.h from making that illegal thing

typedef struct _dlNode {

    struct _dlNode *prev;
    struct _dlNode *next;
    void * data; //pointer to a memory address

} dlNode;

typedef struct _DlList_T {

    struct _dlNode *start; //the first item in the list
    struct _dlNode *cursor; //the current item the list is pointing to
    int curIndex; //index of current item
    int maxIndex; //number of items in list

} * DlList_T;

#include "dlList.h"

...

Or something along those lines. Make sure that DlList_T has been type-defined to be a valid structure, before getting used, in the .h or the .c files. Since you cannot violate the .h file, you should probably just do it right before including it.

It seems that you are most likely being asked to prevent such an illegal type-definition from being made, by using the appropriate preprocessor directive, which is in this case the #define _DLL_IMPL_

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