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I am a student in college and have an assignment which requires finding large prime numbers. I was given the following "simple" algorithm by the professor to find 2 likely prime numbers.

  1. generate random a and p where 1 < a < p
  2. confirm that gcd(a,p) is = 1 -- this is suppose to remove Carmichael numbers Edit(meant equal to 1)
  3. perform "modular exponentiation" if x ^ (p-1) % p = 1 where x begins at zero and increments up to p-1 for both p and a

Example of the 3rd step.

suppose p = 5

1^4 %5 = 1

2^4 %5 = 1

3^4 %5 = 1

4^4 %5 = 1

This shows that 5 is prime.

I am realizing through this assignment that computing prime numbers is no joke. The problem I see with the above algorithm is that if I am guessing large numbers and testing them with the modular exponentiation, I could be attempting to raise a large number to a large number. This places a doubt in my mind. I have looked into Deterministic Finite Automata and the Sieve of Eratosthenes as well. Does anyone have any suggestions to either improve the given algorithm or provide any kind of assistance? Thank you for time.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The algorithm you're following is called the Fermat primality test. However, there are several problems with your explanation:

  • You say "confirm that gcd(a,p) is < 1". This doesn't make sense as the gcd will never be less than one. What you can check is that gcd(a,p)==1. If it isn't 1, then p is not a prime. This can detect Carmichael numbers, but may have only a small chance to do so.

  • The way the test is conducted, is that for a certain value of p, you pick several random values of a and check if a ^ (p-1) % p == 1. If one of them is not 1, then p isn't prime. The more values of a you pick, the better your accuracy.

  • You certainly can't check for all values of x as you say - since there are too many to check.

  • There is a fast way to perform modular exponentiation, even for large base and exponent. See the Wikipedia article. You will still need a method to perform multiplication and modulo on large integers.

  • The Sieve of Eratosthenes is only useful for finding small primes.

  • This test may incorrectly determine that Carmichael numbers are prime. Other algorithms such as Rabin-Miller don't have this problem.

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1  
I don't really see how the gcd test helps to detect carmichael numbers any better than it detects other composite non-carmichael numbers with at least 3 prime factors. It just randomly looks for common factors. –  GregS Feb 21 '10 at 19:33
    
Since gcd(a,p) != 1 implies a^(p-1) % p != 1, it is completely unnecessary to check for gcd(a,p)==1. You might have to do this test if you are actually looking for Carmichael numbers. –  Accipitridae Feb 27 '10 at 10:47

Somewhat simple in C#. I have no idea whether it'd be faster in terms of speed.

bool IsPrime(long n)
    {
        if (n == 1)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (n < 4)
        {
            return true;
        }

        if ((n % 2) == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (n < 9)
        {
            return true;
        }

        if ((n % 3) == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        long r = (long)Math.Floor(Math.Sqrt(n));
        long f = 5;
        while (f <= r)
        {
            if ((n % f) == 0)
            {
                return false;
            }

            if ((n % (f + 2)) == 0)
            {
                return false;
            }

            f += 6;
        }

        return true;
    }
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3  
-1: Given the fact that they need large primes and a suggestion from prof to use randomized algos, this will be totally impractical. –  Aryabhatta Feb 21 '10 at 19:22
    
-1: it would not be faster except for numbers at the low end of long, and does not answer the question since the assignment does not allow to choose a slower but simpler algorithm test. –  GregS Feb 21 '10 at 19:23
    
Moron: It'd be simple to modify it to use a BigNum class instead. GregS: The OP never mentioned that one could not use a different algorithm. (But like I said; I have no idea how efficient above is.) –  Fredrik Ullner Feb 21 '10 at 19:30
3  
Bignum class is not the problem here. For primes of the size needed for cryptography, you could let this run for millions of years and it still won't return. –  interjay Feb 21 '10 at 19:52
    
Even if you replace long with BitInteger it's useless. For rather small primes, such as 2^256 this requires around 2^128 iterations, which will take extremely long. –  CodesInChaos Dec 20 '12 at 13:24

Some time ago I wrote some functions in C# for personal use. I hope that it's good for you

public long tmp; public long[] tabnum = new long[1];

public void priminum(long NUM) { long Resto; long riso;

 // 2 is only number pair prime
 tabnum[0] = 2;

 for (tmp = 3; tmp <= NUM; tmp++)
 {
     if ((tmp % 2) == 0) continue;// if num it's pair is not prime

     for (long Y = 0; Y < tmp; Y++)
     {
          riso = Math.DivRem(tabnum[Y], tmp, out Resto);
          if (Resto == 0) break;
          if(riso <= tabnum[Y]) 
          {
                 Array.Resize(ref tabnum, tabnum.Length + 1);
                 tabnum[tabnum.Length - 1] = tmp;
                 List1.Items.Add(tmp.ToString("###,###"));
                 break;
           } 
      }
  }

}

next function return true if number is prime

private bool IsPrimo(ulong tmpNum) { ulong Y;

 if (tmpNum == 2) return true;

 if ((tmpNum % 2) == 0) return false;

 for (Y = 2; Y <= tmpNum; Y++)
 {
      if ((tmpNum % Y) == 0) break;
      if ((tmpNum / Y) <= Y) return true;
 }

 return false;

}

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This won't be useful for finding large primes of the scale needed for cryptography. –  interjay Feb 21 '10 at 18:45
1  
even worse than the other one. –  GregS Feb 21 '10 at 19:24
    
"even worse than the other one". Thanx, but work. It's not ok for large number, i known this. do you have another best algorithm? :) –  oltre_la_mente Feb 23 '10 at 14:14

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