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Commonly, in a lot of frameworks, you can find examples of creating a query using the query builder. Often you will see:

$query->select('field');
$query->from('entity');

However, in some frameworks you can also do it like this

$object->select('field')
       ->from('table')   
       ->where( new Object_Evaluate('x') )
       ->limit(1) 
       ->order('x', 'ASC');

How do you actually do this kinds of chains?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

This is called Fluent Interface -- there is an example in PHP on that page.

The basic idea is that each method (that you want to be able to chain) of the class has to return $this -- which makes possible to call other methods of that same class on the returned $this.

And, of course, each method has access to the properties of the current instance of the class -- which means each method can "add some information" to the current instance.

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You're welcome :-) ;; yes, each method can set/change properties, and the "last" method is often used to "execute" whatever the previous methods were called to configure. –  Pascal MARTIN Feb 21 '10 at 19:23
    
Not sure using fluent interface will always make code easier to read ;;; when it's used to build some SQL query, for instance, it makes sense ; but when the methods are not really related, not so sure -- depends on the situation, I suppose ;;; a great thing being that even if your methods return $this, they can be called "in a typical way". –  Pascal MARTIN Feb 21 '10 at 19:25
    
Does it have to return $this? Can't it return $that and continue from there? –  Timo Huovinen Apr 7 '14 at 17:16
    
@PascalMARTIN So there isn't a way to trigger the host method (with all the method set values) without casting a string using Fluent Interfaces? –  tfont Apr 22 '14 at 7:06
class c
{
  function select(...)
  {
    ...
    return $this;
  }
  function from(...)
  {
    ...
    return $this;
  }
  ...
}

$object = new c;
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Basically, you have to make every method in the class return the instance:

<?php

class Object_Evaluate{
    private $x;
    public function __construct($x){
        $this->x = $x;
    }
    public function __toString(){
        return 'condition is ' . $this->x;
    }
}
class Foo{
    public function select($what){
        echo "I'm selecting $what\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function from($where){
        echo "From $where\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function where($condition){
        echo "Where $condition\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function limit($condition){
        echo "Limited by $condition\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function order($order){
        echo "Order by $order\n";
        return $this;
    }
}

$object = new Foo;

$object->select('something')
       ->from('table')
       ->where( new Object_Evaluate('x') )
       ->limit(1)
       ->order('x');

?>

This is often used as pure eye candy but I suppose it has its valid usages as well.

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Use case: $setup = $Object->add_component($component_property)->configure($component_properties); Where Object::add_component() returns the Component object it added as a property of $Object (eg. to an array), and it is configured with the Component::configure() method. Without chaining, we would have to determine that last element added to the $Object->Components array, then get the Component object that way. –  AVProgrammer Sep 21 '12 at 0:32
    
@AVProgrammer - Your example does not make use of return $this, does it? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Sep 22 '12 at 19:09
    
Yes it does, the Component object does this, to allow for the configure() method. –  AVProgrammer Sep 24 '12 at 20:57

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