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My problem is this: I can have a maximum of three concurrent tasks running. These tasks can process 1 to 100 jobs simultaneously. I have many threads constantly submitting single jobs, and I want to respond to them as fast as possible. The time taken to process 100 jobs in one task is the same as it takes to process 1 job in one task. Jobs come in at random intervals. Threads that submit jobs need to block until the job is done, or a timeout is hit. Responding quickly to the threads submitting jobs is the driver here.

So my current logic is this: If there are < 3 tasks running, and a job arrives, create a new task to process just that job on it's own. If there are 3 tasks running, put the job in a queue and wait until another task finishes, then take all the jobs from the queue (limit 100) and create a task to process all of them.

I'm just not quite sure the best way to set this up in Java. I created a simple semaphore versions which works fine but does not take advantage of the ability to submit job simultaneously together. How best should I expand this to fully meet my requirements? (there is no requirement to use a semaphore, it's just what I have so far).

private static final Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(3);

public static Response doJob(Job job) throws Exception
{ 
    final boolean tryAcquire = this.semaphore.tryAcquire(this.maxWaitTime, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);

    if (tryAcquire)
    {
        try
        {
            return doJobInNewTask(job); // we'd actually like to do all the jobs which are queued up waiting for the semaphore (if there are any)
        }
        finally
        {
            this.semaphore.release()
        }       
    }
}
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Study the classes in java.util.concurrent, especially the executors and thread pools. You probably don't have to reinvent the wheel. –  Jim Garrison Apr 14 at 21:52
    
@JimGarrison Thanks, I will, my research in that area so far hasn't thrown up any obvious answer. Can you point me to anything more specific? The tricky part is processing queued tasks together in some situations and not in others. Thread pools and executors don't seem to give me that level of control by default but I might not be looking at the right thing. –  jimjim Apr 14 at 22:23
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1 Answer 1

You could use an Executor service with a fixed-size thread pool:

class ExecutorExample {
    private final static ExecutorService executorService;
    private final static long maxWaitTime = 5000;

    static {
        executorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);
    }

    private static class Response {}
    private static class Job {}

    public static Response doJob(final Job job) throws Exception {
        final Future<Response> future = executorService.submit(
            new Callable<Response>() {
                @Override
                public Response call() throws Exception {
                    return doJobInNewTask(job);
                }
            }
        );
        try {
            // get() blocks until the task finishes.
            return future.get(maxWaitTime, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
        }
        catch (final TimeoutException e) {
            // we timed out, so *try* to cancel the task (may be too late)
            future.cancel(/*mayInterruptIfRunning:*/false);
            throw e;
        }
    }

    private static Response doJobInNewTask(final Job job) {
        try { Thread.sleep(maxWaitTime / 2); }
        catch (final InterruptedException ignored) {}
        return new Response();
    }

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            final Thread t = new Thread() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        System.out.println(doJob(new Job()));
                    }
                    catch (final Exception e) {
                        System.out.println(e.getClass().getSimpleName());
                    }
                }
            };
            threads.add(t);
            t.start();
        }

        for (final Thread thread : threads) {
            try { thread.join(); }
            catch (final InterruptedException ignored) {}
        }

        System.out.println("Done!");
    }
}

Output:

ExecutorExample$Response@1fe4169
ExecutorExample$Response@9fdee
ExecutorExample$Response@15b123b
ExecutorExample$Response@bbfa5c
ExecutorExample$Response@10d95cd
ExecutorExample$Response@131de9b
TimeoutException
TimeoutException
TimeoutException
TimeoutException
Done!

One potential issue here is that of cancellation. Since the scheduling is out of your hands, it is possible that a task may be started after you time out waiting for it, but before cancel() has a chance to do its thing. The result won't get propagated, but if the task has meaningful side effects, this approach could create issues.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @MikeStrobel, as far as I understand, your code implements the timeout requirement and the limit of 3 simultaneous tasks using the ThreadPool/Future pattern. But it does not take advantage of the ability to process jobs together in one task. So say you have 3 running tasks, 5 queued, when a task slot frees up, it could do the work of all 5 queued in one go. –  jimjim Apr 14 at 22:16
    
Ah, I missed the part where you said, "the time taken to process 100 jobs in one task is the same as it takes to process 1 job in one task.". You could modify my example such that the scheduled Callable takes as many jobs from a queue a possible, as opposed to capturing and running a single task. Basically, instead of scheduling the processing of a single job, you'd be scheduling a sort of "queue/batch processor" (with a limit on how many items it processes). –  Mike Strobel Apr 14 at 22:56
    
I played around with your approach but in the end found it easier to adapt my earlier code to meet the requirements. But your approach may be better... I posted my new code on the stackexchange code review site if you have any further advice: codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/47352/… –  jimjim Apr 16 at 13:40
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