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I want to understand polymorphism in c# so by trying out several constructs I came up with the following case:

class Shape
{
    public virtual void Draw()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Shape.Draw()");
    }
}

class Circle : Shape
{
    public override void Draw()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Circle.Draw()");
    }
}

I understand that in order to send the Draw() message to several related objects, so they can act according to its own implementation I must change the instance to which (in this case) shape is 'pointing' to:

Shape shape = new Circle();
shape.Draw(); //OK; This prints: Circle.Draw()

But why, when I do this:

Circle circle = new Circle();
circle.Draw(); //OK; This prints: Circle.Draw()

Shape shape = circle as Shape; // or Shape shape = (Shape)circle;
shape.Draw();

It prints: "Circle.Draw()"

Why it calls the Circle.Draw() instead Shape.Draw() after the cast? What is the reasoning for this?

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1  
Casting doesn't alter the actual instance - just the variable that points to it. –  Blorgbeard Apr 14 at 23:37
2  
+1 Great question, and kudos for looking to really understand what is going on in OOP. –  BradleyDotNET Apr 14 at 23:50

5 Answers 5

Casting does not change run-time type of object and what implementation of particular virtual method each instance have.

Note that following 2 cases you have as sample are identical:

Shape shape = new Circle();
shape.Draw(); //OK; This prints: Circle.Draw()

and:

Circle circle = new Circle();
Shape shape = circle as Shape;
shape.Draw();

The first one is essentially shorter version of the second.

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So if I understood right, from a general point of view: 1. The runtime checks the runtime type of variable shape. 2. It determines is of type Circle. What would be the 3rd, 4th, nth step so finally call Circle.Draw()? –  user3105717 Apr 15 at 0:04
    
@user3105717 3: check if Circle overrides Draw -> yes call it, no -> go to parent and check... (In reality it is simple as compiler/JIT are able to figure out much of it in advance - "call whatever implementation of Draw is set in (run-type) type of the object"). See LordTakkera's answer for more details on inner working - or check out VMT on Wikipedia. –  Alexei Levenkov Apr 15 at 1:00

As others have mentioned, casting an object doesn't change the actual instance; instead, casting allows a variable to assume a subset of characteristics of the instance from higher in the object hierarchy.

To demonstrate why it needs to work this way, consider this example:

//Some buffer that holds all the shapes that we will draw onscreen
List<Shape> shapesOnScreen = new List<Shape>();

shapesOnScreen.Add(new Square());
shapesOnScreen.Add(new Circle());

//Draw all shapes
foreach(Shape shape in shapesOnScreen)
{
    shape.Draw();
}

Calling Draw() in the foreach loop will call the Draw() method of the derived instance, i.e. Square.Draw() and Circle.Draw(). This allows you, in this example, to draw each individual shape without knowing exactly which shape you're drawing at runtime. You just know you need a shape, let the shape handle how it's drawn.

If this was not the case (and this goes for inheritance in other languages, not just C#), you wouldn't be able to use anything but Shape.Draw().

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+1 for practical application of polymorphism –  BradleyDotNET Apr 14 at 23:51

You're overriding the method in the inheriting class so it will always be the version that gets invoked regardless of whether your reference is to the less specific base class.

If you want to invoke the version in Shape you need an instance of type Shape not just a reference of that type.

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I agree with your first statement, but I'm more insterested in the details of why. What is the internal mechanism for this to happen. –  user3105717 Apr 15 at 0:01
    
@user3105717 well I don't want to comment on that too casually but I can perhaps put in an edit after reviewing my thoughts. One thing to note is that you use some Objective-C style phrasing which might be part of your confusion. C# does not behave like this, I'm not sending "messages" to the "class" or whatever. It's more static than that. It's more along the lines of, at compile time the compiler determines the underlying type, finds the definition of that method and in-lines or references it. Don't take that explanation as fact, as I need to do some review to give a fully accurate answer. –  evanmcdonnal Apr 15 at 0:47

The other answers are absolutely correct, but to try and go one level deeper:

Polymorphism is implemented by using something called a virtual function pointer table (vTable). In essence, you get something like:

Shape -> Shape.Draw()

Circle -> Circle.Draw()

When you call a function marked "virtual" the compiler does a typeof, and calls the most derived implementation of that function that is part of the types inheritance tree. Since Circle inherits from Shape, and you have a Circle object (as noted before, casting does not affect the underlying type), Circle.Draw is called.

Obviously this is an oversimplification of what actually happens, but hopefully it helps explain why polymorphic behavior acts the way it does.

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Let me explain it in terms of is-a, because the shape is a circle:

Shape shape = circle as Shape;

The code explains itself perfectly, you are referring the circle as a shape, the shape does not change at all, and it is still a circle, although it is also a shape.

You can even check if it is a circle:

if (shape is Circle)
    Console.WriteLine("The shape is a Circle!");

It is a circle, right? So invoking Circle.Draw() should be perfectly logical.

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