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Problem: When my csv datefield=' ', the mysql server is converting the date to 1900,01,01.

what i want: I want to dynamically evaluate whether i'm about to send over '' for a date, and instead send NULL or None.

EDIT: as recommended by beargle I tried pypyodbc wrote this crazy code... and it seems to work.

I create a list of which columns are dates, go item by item through it and evaluate whether it should be None.

let me know if you have better ideas, please!

import pypyodbc as pyodbc

def sendTOSQL(csvLocation,sqlTableName):
    x=0
    with open (csvLocation, 'r') as f:
                cnxn = pyodbc.connect('DSN=dashboarddatadev')
                cursor = cnxn.cursor()            
                reader = csv.reader(f)
                list=[]
                cursor.execute('select * from %s' % sqlTableName)
                for i in cursor.description:
                    if i[1].__name__=='datetime':
                        list.append(1)
                    else: 
                        list.append(0)
                cnxn2 = pyodbc.connect('DSN=dashboarddatadev')
                cursor = cnxn2.cursor()            
                reader = csv.reader(f)
                columns = next(reader) 
                print columns
                for data in reader:
                        changeNulls=zip(data,list)
                        y=0
                        for item in changeNulls:
                            if item[1]==1 and item[0]==' ':
                                data[y]=None
                            y=y+1
                        query = 'insert into {0}({1}) values ({2})'
                        query = query.format(sqlTableName,','.join(columns), ','.join('?' * len(columns)))
                        itemchange=re.compile(re.escape('case,'),re.IGNORECASE)
                        query=itemchange.sub('"case",',query)
                        itemchange=re.compile(re.escape('full,'),re.IGNORECASE)
                        query=itemchange.sub('"full",',query)
                        cursor.execute(query, data)
                        if x % 1000000==0:
                            if len(str(x)) > 7:
                                xstar=str(x)[0:2]
                            else:
                                xstar=str(x)[0]
                            if xstar=='0':
                                logging.debug(r'processing and counting rows to a million' )
                            else:
                                logging.debug(r'%s,000,000 rows processed and counting' % (xstar))
                        x=x+1
                cursor.commit() 
share|improve this question
1  
You might check out pypyodbc and see if it gives you the same issue. –  Wayne Werner Apr 15 '14 at 1:27
    
How are you ensuring the column order of the csv matches the table definition? –  Bryan Eargle Apr 15 '14 at 15:33
    
Thee sql table derives from the source of the csv at an earlier step in the process. The data is initially manipulated in a legacy software the government uses, and one row from the dataset is used to make the sql table (the legacy software is too slow to do the whole job at 100 rows/second. thanks for the help. –  Chet Meinzer Apr 15 '14 at 16:13
    
@beargle I was having a lot of errors with the above script, but then i tried pypyodbc, and it worked. thank you. –  Chet Meinzer Apr 15 '14 at 20:10

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