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I'd like to write a horribly non-parametric version of a function of type

pretty :: (Show a) => a -> Text

such that

pretty :: Text -> Text = id
pretty :: String -> Text = T.pack
pretty :: (Show a) => a -> Text = T.pack . show

So the idea is that anything that already has a Show instance can be turned into a "pretty" Text by just show-ing it, except for Text and String which we want to special-case.

The following code works:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}
{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-}
{-# LANGUAGE TypeSynonymInstances, FlexibleInstances, FlexibleContexts #-}
{-# LANGUAGE DataKinds, ConstraintKinds #-}
module Pretty (pretty) where

import Data.Text (Text)
import qualified Data.Text as T

type family StringLike a :: Bool where
    StringLike String = True
    StringLike Text = True
    StringLike a = False

class (b ~ StringLike a) => Pretty' a b where
    pretty' :: a -> Text

instance Pretty' String True where
    pretty' = T.pack

instance Pretty' Text True where
    pretty' = id

instance (Show a, StringLike a ~ False) => Pretty' a False where
    pretty' = T.pack . show

type Pretty a = (Pretty' a (StringLike a))

pretty :: (Pretty a) => a -> Text
pretty = pretty'

and it can be used without exporting anything except the pretty function.

However, I am not too happy about the type signature for pretty:

pretty :: (Pretty a) => a -> Text

I feel that since StringLike is a closed type family, there should be a way for GHC to figure out that if only (Show a) holds, (Pretty a) is already satisfied, since:

1. The following hold trivially just by substituting the results of applying StringLike:
(StringLike String ~ True, Pretty' String True)
(StringLike Text ~ True, Pretty' Text True)

2. For everything else, we *also* know the result of applying StringLike:
(Show a, StringLike a ~ False) => (Pretty' a (StringLike a))

Is there a way to convince GHC of this?

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A 'ha-ha just serious' idea just occured to me which is to import Prelude qualified, and rename Pretty to Show... –  Cactus Apr 16 '14 at 2:39
2  
"I feel that since StringLike is a closed type family, there should be a way for GHC to figure out that if only (Show a) holds," I think the following is a big problem: StringLike yields a type of kind(-lifted) Bool, Show yields a type of kind Constraint. It's not just that GHC doesn't understand the relationship; they actually follow different laws of logic. With lifted Bool, you assume the law of the excluded middle, but with Constraint, you may not rely on that. –  Rhymoid May 15 '14 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I feel that since StringLike is a closed type family, there should be a way for GHC to figure out that if only (Show a) holds, (Pretty a) is already satisfied

To do that would require type inspection, and would break parameteric polymorphism. Consider defining a type family

type family IsInt a :: Bool where
  IsInt Int = True
  IsInt a = False
class (b ~ IsInt a) => TestInt a b where
  isInt :: a -> Bool
instance TestInt Int True where
  isInt _ = True
instance (IsInt a ~ False) => TestInt a False where
  isInt _ = False

Now by your argument, ghc should be able to satisfy TestInt a from (). In other words, we should be able to test for any given type whether it is equal to Int. This is clearly impossible.

Similarly, a Show a dictionary is equivalent to a function a -> ShowS. How would you be able to decide, given just that, whether the argument is StringLike?

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1  
"In other words, we should be able to test for any given type whether it is equal to Int. This is clearly impossible." Is it? Don't we already need this for e.g. type unification? What am I missing here? –  Rhymoid May 15 '14 at 14:01
    
So basically your point is that we can only prove (Show a) => (Pretty a), in some sense, non-constructively? –  Cactus May 16 '14 at 1:36
    
Isn't IsInt already possible with hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.7.0.0/candidate/docs/…? –  copumpkin May 16 '14 at 3:35

Maybe I misunderstood your goal but this seems like a lot of work to get the type you want.

{-# LANGUAGE TypeSynonymInstances, FlexibleInstances, UndecidableInstances, IncoherentInstances #-}
module Prettied where 

import Data.Text (Text, pack)

class Pretty a where pretty :: a -> Text 

instance           Pretty Text   where pretty = id 
instance           Pretty String where pretty = pack 
instance Show a => Pretty a      where pretty = pack . show 

While it may seem that pretty should have type Pretty a => a -> Text, due to IncoherentInstances it will actually have type Show a => a -> Text. This should probably be in its own module because enabling IncoherentInstances is one of those things that can break valid code.

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6  
I would strongly advise against the use of IncoherentInstances. With this definition, pretty "foo" results in "foo". But if you add pretty2 x = pretty x, then pretty2 "foo" results in "\"foo\"". Not very robust or predictable. –  kosmikus Apr 15 '14 at 6:33
2  
Yeah, the goal is to do this without nasty stuff like IncoherentInstances or UndecideableInstances. –  Cactus Apr 15 '14 at 8:40
2  
just OverlappingInstances works here. I think we're just at a bit of an awkward stage where we don't have the function-level analog to go with closed type families, so we can define these kinds of things fairly easily, but have to uses type classes (which we can't close), OverlappingInstances, UndecidableInstances, etc –  jberryman Apr 15 '14 at 17:33

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