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I'm trying to promote my Aggregator type to a class and I can't figure out how to do it.

I have this:

data Aggregator a b = Aggregator { aggregate :: [a] -> b }
minMax = Aggregator (\xs -> (minimum xs, maximum))

and I would like something like :

class Aggregator (g a b) where
   aggregate :: g -> [a] -> b

So I can do things like :

data DoubleAggregator a b = DoubleAggregator ([a] -> b) ([a] -> b)

instance Aggregator (DoubleAggregator a b) where
     aggregate (DoubleAggregator f g) as = (f as, g as)

Which obviously doesn't work. I think I need either MultipleParamTypeClasses or FamilyTypes but I can't figure it out. I know, in that particular I don't really needed classes and could do just with data Aggregator a b ..., but I'm still interested in how to do it with classes. So how can I do it ?

share|improve this question
    
I know you are specifically interested in handling this with classes, but it sounds more like a fold problem, even if you just used data Aggregator a b. ..., as it is it looks like the empty list isn't likely to be handled correctly. You might want to look into Monoid and folds? –  unfoldr Apr 15 '14 at 8:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that your instance for DoubleAggregator is not well typed, since the output is (b,b) but the class declaration says that it must be b. So you either figure out a way to merge your two bs into one, which is probably not desirable, or make your output type depend on your aggregator type:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

class Aggregator g where
  type Result x y z 
  aggregate :: g a b -> [a] -> Result g a b

data SingleAggregator a b = SingleAggregator ([a] -> b)
instance Aggregator SingleAggregator where 
  type Result SingleAggregator a b = b
  aggregate (SingleAggregator f) = f 

data DoubleAggregator a b = DoubleAggregator ([a] -> b) ([a] -> b)
instance Aggregator DoubleAggregator where
  type Result DoubleAggregator a b = (b,b)
  aggregate (DoubleAggregator f g) as = (f as, g as)

Note that the class does not mention a or b, since those are both free to be any types, and don't depend on the aggregator type. The type Result is a function of three things: the type of aggregator, and the types inside the aggregator. It's possible that your result will never depend on the input type, a, in which case you can write something like:

class Aggregator g where
  type Result x y 
  aggregate :: g a b -> [a] -> Result g b

....

  type Result SingleAggregator b = b

....

  type Result DoubleAggregator b = (b, b)

You can also do this with MultiParamTypeClasses and FunctionalDependancies but it is more complex and the types are harder to read, so in my opinion it is a worse solution, and I only include it for completeness.

{-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses, FunctionalDependencies, FlexibleInstances #-}

class Aggregator g a b r | g a b -> r where
  aggregate :: g a b -> [a] -> r

data SingleAggregator a b = SingleAggregator ([a] -> b)
instance Aggregator SingleAggregator a b b where 
  aggregate (SingleAggregator f) = f 

data DoubleAggregator a b = DoubleAggregator ([a] -> b) ([a] -> b)
instance Aggregator DoubleAggregator a b (b,b) where
  aggregate (DoubleAggregator f g) as = (f as, g as)

The main difference is the functional dependancy: | g a b -> r; which says that for there is one unique r that can exist for some g a b.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for showing both ways. –  mb14 Apr 15 '14 at 9:07

In addition to using type families or functional dependencies (as in user2407038's answer) another alternative is to use a GADT.

{-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-}

class Aggregator g where
    aggregate :: g a b -> [a] -> b


data SingleAggregator a b = SingleAggregator ( [a] -> b )

data DoubleAggregator a b where
    DoubleAggregator :: ([a] -> b) -> ([a] -> b) -> DoubleAggregator a (b, b)


instance Aggregator SingleAggregator where
    aggregate (SingleAggregator f) as = f as

instance Aggregator DoubleAggregator where
    aggregate (DoubleAggregator f g) as = (f as, g as)

Whether this is a better or worse alternative depends on your exact use-case but I find it much simpler in practice than the type class extensions.

The GADT approach also allows you to ditch the type class altogether if you want and just use a single algebraic type.

data Aggregator a b where
    SingleAggregator :: ([a] -> b) -> Aggregator a b
    DoubleAggregator :: ([a] -> b) -> ([a] -> b) -> Aggregator a (b, b)

aggregate :: Aggregator a b -> [a] -> b
aggregate (SingleAggregator f)   as = f as
aggregate (DoubleAggregator f g) as = (f as, g as)

However, probably the most "Haskell-y" way of approaching this was to have just a single Aggregator newtype and make that composable with the Applicative type-class. For example:

import Control.Applicative

newtype Aggregator a b = Aggregator { aggregate :: [a] -> b }

instance Functor (Aggregator a) where
    fmap f (Aggregator g) = Aggregator (f . g)

instance Applicative (Aggregator a) where
    pure = Aggregator . const
    Aggregator f <*> Aggregator x = Aggregator $ f <*> x

Now you can define simple aggregators like

minAgg = Aggregator minimum
maxAgg = Aggregator maximum

and then compose them into more complex aggregators using the Applicative interface

minMax = liftA2 (,) minAgg maxAgg
share|improve this answer
    
I really like that! Thank you (I might have finally understood what GADT are for :). –  mb14 Apr 15 '14 at 9:04
    
Thanks. :) I also added an example that uses Applicatives which I think is the most commonly used pattern in problems like this. –  shang Apr 15 '14 at 9:15

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