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A few languages - like Delphi - has a very convenient way of creating indexers: not only the whole class, but even single properties can be indexed, for instance:

type TMyClass = class(TObject)
protected
    function GetMyProp(index : integer) : string;
    procedure SetMyProp(index : integer; value : string);
public
    property MyProp[index : integer] : string read GetMyProp write SetMyProp;
end;

This can be used easily:

var c : TMyClass;

begin
    c = TMyClass.Create;
    c.MyProp[5] := 'Ala ma kota';
    c.Free;
end;

Is there a way to achieve the same effect in C# easily?

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possible duplicate of Is following Indexer property possible? –  nawfal Jun 5 '14 at 21:04
    
@nawfal I see no interface in the solution? (this is knowledge-sharing question, BTW - the answer is mine as well) –  Spook Jun 7 '14 at 14:36
    
The q is exactly the same, OP is after named indexers. You could provide an answer in that thread. You may not have seen the original q at the time of answering, but had you, then adding another question for merely answering is not appropriate. Btw, good answer, +1 (in some related q, this answer is also covered). –  nawfal Jun 7 '14 at 15:27
    
@nawfal I believe, that there's a special checkbox when you ask a question named "Answer your question - share knowledge in Q&A style". –  Spook Jun 7 '14 at 17:01
    
yes, but that's reserved for non-duplicate questions. My problem is not with your answer ("knowledge"), but the question. No big deal. Duplicates happen all the time. Its up to us as responsible members to do the clean up. Just doing my part. –  nawfal Jun 7 '14 at 17:02

1 Answer 1

The well-known solution is to create a proxy class:

public class MyClass
{
    public class MyPropProxy
    {
        private MyClass c;

        // ctor etc.

        public string this[int index]
        {
            get
            {
                return c.list[index];
            }
            set
            {
                c.list[index] = value;
            }
        }
    }

    private List<string> list;
    private MyPropProxy myPropProxy;

    // ctor etc.

    public MyPropProxy MyProp
    { 
        get
        {
            return myPropProxy;
        }
    }
}

But (with exception, that this actually solves the problem), this solution introduces mostly only cons:

  • It causes the code to be polluted by (possibly) a lot of small proxy classes.
  • Presented solution breaks encapsulation a little (inner class accesses private members of the outer class), a better one would pass an instance of list to MyPropProxy's ctor, what would require even more code.
  • Exposing internal helper classes is not something I would suggest. One may solve that by introducing additional interface, but that's even one more entity to implement (test, maintain etc.)

There's another way, though. It also pollutes the code a little, but surely a lot less, than the previous one:

public interface IMyProp
{
    string this[int index] { get; }
}

public class MyClass : IMyProp
{
    private List<string> list;

    string IMyProp.this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return list[index];
        }
        set
        {
            list[index] = value;
        }
    }

    // ctor etc.

    public IMyProp MyProp 
    {
        get
        {
            return this;
        }
    }
}

Pros:

  • No proxy classes (which occupy space in memory, serve only a single purpose and (in the simplest solution) breaks encapsulation.
  • Simple solution, requires little code to add another indexed property

Cons:

  • Each property requires a different public interface
  • With increase of indexed properties, the class implements more and more interfaces

This is the simplest (in terms of code length and complexity) way of introducing indexed properties to C#. Unless someone posts even shorter and simpler one, of course.

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