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Is it possible to write a C macro that returns the number of its arguments?

I want something that does:

foo(1) -> 1
foo(cat, dog) -> 2
foo(red, green, blue) -> 3

Even better if this macro can be defined in such a way that it works with ## so that

foo(1) -> bar1(1)
foo(cat, dog) -> bar2(cat, dog)
foo(red, green, blue) -> car3(red, green, blue)

Thanks!

EDIT: I really want a macro, not a function. Suggestions to use functions will be downvoted.

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marked as duplicate by Eitan T, vba4all, Morten Kristensen, Dave, Mohsen Nosratinia Sep 10 '13 at 19:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Why not just use a function with a variable-length argument list? –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 1:14
1  
If you could do it in any meaningful way we'd all be doing it by now and you would know. –  jbcreix Feb 22 '10 at 1:14
    
@jbcreix You cannot invent anything new with this approach :) It is possible - see my response below. –  qrdl Feb 22 '10 at 6:17
    
@Anon, in C in a variable-length argument list you need to know the number of arguments one way or the other. E.g. printf can crash if your number of arguments doesn't correspond to the number expected in the format string (actually: only if not enough arguments given and then it also depends on the types). –  Patrick Feb 22 '10 at 6:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 49 down vote accepted

It can be done - the mechanism was explained in the comp.std.c newsgroup in January 2006. There was another question about this recently on SO 2124339.

I stashed the code away, just in case...

#ifndef JLSS_ID_NARG_H
#define JLSS_ID_NARG_H

/*
** http://groups.google.com/group/comp.std.c/browse_thread/thread/77ee8c8f92e4a3fb/346fc464319b1ee5?pli=1
**
**    Newsgroups: comp.std.c
**    From: Laurent Deniau <laurent.deniau@cern.ch>
**    Date: Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:43:40 +0100
**    Subject: __VA_NARG__
**
**    A year ago, I was asking here for an equivalent of __VA_NARG__ which
**    would return the number of arguments contained in __VA_ARGS__ before its
**    expansion. In fact my problem at that time (detecting for a third
**    argument) was solved by the solution of P. Mensonides. But I was still
**    thinking that the standard should have provided such a facilities rather
**    easy to compute for cpp.
**
**    This morning I had to face again the same problem, that is knowing the
**    number of arguments contained in __VA_ARGS__ before its expansion (after
**    its expansion can always be achieved if you can do it before). I found a
**    simple non-iterative solution which may be of interest here as an answer
**    to who will ask in the future for a kind of __VA_NARG__ in the standard
**    and I post it for archiving. May be some more elegant-efficient solution
**    exists?
**
**    Returns NARG, the number of arguments contained in __VA_ARGS__ before
**    expansion as far as NARG is >0 and <64 (cpp limits):
**
**    #define PP_NARG( ...) PP_NARG_(__VA_ARGS__,PP_RSEQ_N())
**    #define PP_NARG_(...) PP_ARG_N(__VA_ARGS__)
**    #define PP_ARG_N(_1,_2,_3,_4,_5,_6,_7,_8,_9,[..],_61,_62,_63,N,...) N
**    #define PP_RSEQ_N() 63,62,61,60,[..],9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0
**
**    [..] stands for the continuation of the sequence omitted here for
**    lisibility.
**
**    PP_NARG(A) -> 1
**    PP_NARG(A,B) -> 2
**    PP_NARG(A,B,C) -> 3
**    PP_NARG(A,B,C,D) -> 4
**    PP_NARG(A,B,C,D,E) -> 5
**    PP_NARG(A1,A2,[..],A62,A63) -> 63
**
** ======
**
**    Newsgroups: comp.std.c
**    From: Roland Illig <roland.il...@gmx.de>
**    Date: Fri, 20 Jan 2006 12:58:41 +0100
**    Subject: Re: __VA_NARG__
**
**    Laurent Deniau wrote:
**    > This morning I had to face again the same problem, that is knowing the
**    > number of arguments contained in __VA_ARGS__ before its expansion (after
**    > its expansion can always be achieved if you can do it before). I found a
**    > simple non-iterative solution which may be of interest here as an answer
**    > to who will ask in the future for a kind of __VA_NARG__ in the standard
**    > and I post it for archiving. May be some more elegant-efficient solution
**    > exists?
**
**    Thanks for this idea. I really like it.
**
**    For those that only want to copy and paste it, here is the expanded version:
**
** // Some test cases
** PP_NARG(A) -> 1
** PP_NARG(A,B) -> 2
** PP_NARG(A,B,C) -> 3
** PP_NARG(A,B,C,D) -> 4
** PP_NARG(A,B,C,D,E) -> 5
** PP_NARG(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    //  1..10
**         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    // 11..20
**         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    // 21..30
**         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    // 31..40
**         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    // 41..50
**         1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,    // 51..60
**         1,2,3) -> 63
**
**Note: using PP_NARG() without arguments would violate 6.10.3p4 of ISO C99.
*/

/* The PP_NARG macro returns the number of arguments that have been
** passed to it.
*/

#define PP_NARG(...) \
    PP_NARG_(__VA_ARGS__,PP_RSEQ_N())
#define PP_NARG_(...) \
    PP_ARG_N(__VA_ARGS__)
#define PP_ARG_N( \
     _1, _2, _3, _4, _5, _6, _7, _8, _9,_10, \
    _11,_12,_13,_14,_15,_16,_17,_18,_19,_20, \
    _21,_22,_23,_24,_25,_26,_27,_28,_29,_30, \
    _31,_32,_33,_34,_35,_36,_37,_38,_39,_40, \
    _41,_42,_43,_44,_45,_46,_47,_48,_49,_50, \
    _51,_52,_53,_54,_55,_56,_57,_58,_59,_60, \
    _61,_62,_63,  N, ...) N
#define PP_RSEQ_N() \
    63,62,61,60,                   \
    59,58,57,56,55,54,53,52,51,50, \
    49,48,47,46,45,44,43,42,41,40, \
    39,38,37,36,35,34,33,32,31,30, \
    29,28,27,26,25,24,23,22,21,20, \
    19,18,17,16,15,14,13,12,11,10, \
     9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0

#endif /* JLSS_ID_NARG_H */

It works fine as long as there are no more than 64 arguments. Here's the test code I used:

#include "narg.h"
#include <stdio.h>

#define PRINT(pp_narg)     printf("%2d = %s\n", pp_narg, # pp_narg)

#ifndef lint
/* Prevent over-aggressive optimizers from eliminating ID string */
extern const char jlss_id_narg_c[];
const char  jlss_id_narg_c[] = "@(#)$Id: narg.c,v 1.2 2010/01/24 18:12:05 jleffler Exp $";
#endif  /* lint */

int
main(void)
{
    PRINT(PP_NARG(A));
    PRINT(PP_NARG(A, B));
    PRINT(PP_NARG(A, B, C));
    PRINT(PP_NARG(A, B, C, D));
    PRINT(PP_NARG(A, B, C, D, E));

    PRINT(PP_NARG(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 1..10
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 11..20
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 21..30
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 31..40
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 41..50
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 51..60
                  1, 2, 3));

    /**
    ** If the number of arguments to PP_NARG() is greater than 63, the
    ** 64th argument is returned.  This is well-defined behaviour, but
    ** not exactly what was intended.
    */
    PRINT(PP_NARG(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 1..10
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 11..20
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 21..30
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 31..40
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 41..50
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 51..60
                  1, 2, 3, -123456789));

    PRINT(PP_NARG(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 1..10
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 11..20
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 21..30
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 31..40
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 41..50
                  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, // 51..60
                  1, 2, 3, -123456789, -987654321));

    return(0);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Clever... unfortunately (for me anyway), it requires C99-style __VA_ARGS__ support. Still, very clever. –  Michael Burr Feb 22 '10 at 5:37
3  
This is ingenious. Deserves more upvotes. –  anon Feb 22 '10 at 8:47
3  
@MichaelBurr I think asking for support for a standard from more than 10 years ago is reasonable. –  Matti Virkkunen Oct 6 '13 at 1:22

I use following macro:

#define NUMARGS(...)  (sizeof((int[]){__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int))

Please note that it works only for C99, because variadic macros were not supported in C89. Although it doesn't work for zero arguments.

But if you are using GCC, you can use slightly modified macro:

#define NUMARGS(...)  (sizeof((int[]){0, ##__VA_ARGS__})/sizeof(int)-1)

It works correctly even for zero arguments, because GCC's preprocessor removes extra comma when you are pasting empty __VA_ARGS__.

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1  
Unfortunately, this does not work if the arguments to NUMARGS() are undefined or are strings, as in int main() { return NUMARGS("a",b,c); } –  18446744073709551615 May 15 at 7:58

I realize this is a pretty old question, but as no one ever answered the 'bonus' to add the number to the function names, here is an example of that part with Jonathan's answer reduced to 9 args for brevity. It assumes you have predefined the numbered functions, or will use this as a basis to define them.

#define MKFN(fn,...) MKFN_N(fn,##__VA_ARGS__,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0)(__VA_ARGS__)
#define MKFN_N(fn,n0,n1,n2,n3,n4,n5,n6,n7,n8,n,...) fn##n
#define myfunc(...) MKFN(myfunc,##__VA_ARGS__)
myfunc();
myfunc(a,b,c,d,e,f);

//gcc -E this.c
//myfunc0();
//myfunc6(a,b,c,d,e,f);

one place where I have seen these types of functions was in the Linux kernel's syscalls, but the numbers would be off by one because the first argument is the syscall number (usually defined as __NR_something), so here is an example that accounts for that.

#define MKFN(fn,...) MKFN_N(fn,##__VA_ARGS__,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0)(__VA_ARGS__)
#define MKFN_N(fn,NR,n0,n1,n2,n3,n4,n5,n6,n7,n8,n,...) fn##n
#define syscall(...) MKFN(syscall,##__VA_ARGS__)
syscall(__NR_fork);
syscall(77,a,b,c,d,e,f);//fake example
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