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For instance:

#include <stdio.h>

void why_cant_we_switch_him(void *ptr)
{
    switch (ptr) {
        case NULL:
            printf("NULL!\n");
            break;
        default:
            printf("%p!\n", ptr);
            break;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    void *foo = "toast";
    why_cant_we_switch_him(foo);
    return 0;
}

gcc test.c -o test
test.c: In function 'why_cant_we_switch_him':
test.c:5: error: switch quantity not an integer
test.c:6: error: pointers are not permitted as case values

Just curious. Is this a technical limitation?

EDIT

People seem to think there is only one constant pointer expression. Is that is really true, though? For instance, here is a common paradigm in Objective-C (it is really only C aside from NSString, id and nil, which are merely a pointers, so it is still relevant — I just wanted to point out that there is, in fact, a common use for it, despite this being only a technical question):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <Foundation/Foundation.h>

static NSString * const kMyConstantObject = @"Foo";

void why_cant_we_switch_him(id ptr)
{
    switch (ptr) {
        case kMyConstantObject: // (Note that we are comparing pointers, not string values.)
            printf("We found him!\n");
            break;
        case nil:
            printf("He appears to be nil (or NULL, whichever you prefer).\n");
            break;
        default:
            printf("%p!\n", ptr);
            break;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    NSString *foo = @"toast";
    why_cant_we_switch_him(foo);
    foo = kMyConstantObject;
    why_cant_we_switch_him(foo);

    return 0;
}

gcc test.c -o test -framework Foundation
test.c: In function 'why_cant_we_switch_him':
test.c:5: error: switch quantity not an integer
test.c:6: error: pointers are not permitted as case values

It appears that the reason is that switch only allows integral values (as the compiler warning said). So I suppose a better question would be to ask why this is the case? (though it is probably too late now.)

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11  
Why would you want to? Isn't if (ptr) { ... } else { ... } good enough for you? –  Paul Tomblin Feb 22 '10 at 1:43
6  
Why do you want to switch on a pointer? if(ptr) not good enough for you or something? –  Anon. Feb 22 '10 at 1:44
23  
Why ask why? Its a reasonable language question, with a well written example. Whether or not its a good idea is not on trial here. –  Justicle Feb 22 '10 at 1:51
5  
It was just a question about how the language works. Of course if (ptr != NULL) is "good enough" (certainly preferable in this simple case), but there are cases where I have a list of pointers to check, and I found it a bit strange that this syntax didn't work with it — I was just asking why. –  Michael Feb 22 '10 at 2:13
8  
switch is a generalization of a jump table. Jump tables are indexed with integers, not pointers. If your case labels are too spread out the compiler probably converts most or all of them to if/else. There's no benefit from using switch/case with non-integral labels instead of if/else. –  Dan Olson Feb 22 '10 at 2:47
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11 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Switch statements operate on integral values only. That's why the error message is "switch quantity not an integer." I don't think it's a technical limitation so much as it's outside the language syntax.

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1  
It is more semantic than syntactic - syntactically, you can't tell the difference between 'int ptr; ... switch (ptr)' and 'void *ptr; ... switch (ptr)', but semantically, there is a difference. But you are right; the language does not allow 'switch on non-integral type'. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 22 '10 at 3:44
    
It is possible to reinterpret a pointer into a DWORD or QWORD and just use that, though, which makes void *ptr look like int ptr. Anything is possible, really, it just depends on how many * and & you're willing to have in one line. That doesn't mean everything is good to do, but a pointer-based switch seems safe-ish. –  ssube May 9 '10 at 4:16
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Because there is only one constant pointer expression

Given that only a single constant pointer expression exists, the switch statement has little to offer pointer expressions. You have cited essentially the only possible construction.

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1  
Bam. This seems to be the reason. I'm not sure why it escaped nearly everyone else that switch cases operated off of constants. –  San Jacinto Feb 22 '10 at 2:24
1  
You could have a other constant pointer expressions like "char * vgabuffer = (char *)(0xB800)" –  Tarydon Feb 22 '10 at 2:24
    
The addresses of variables that have static storage duration are also constant. –  caf Feb 22 '10 at 2:33
    
@caf: no, C99 calls those address constants .. see 6.6 (9). You cannot, for example, get away with int y; int x[&y]; –  DigitalRoss Feb 22 '10 at 2:47
1  
@Tarydon: perhaps I should have said "there is only one portable constant ..." :-) –  DigitalRoss Feb 22 '10 at 2:50
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Cast ptr to an int and try again:

switch( (int)ptr )

or to be more correct:

switch( (intptr_t)ptr ) // C99 integer type to hold a pointer
share|improve this answer
    
The appropriate workaround for compiler not supporting the one legitimate use of switch on pointer. I like that. –  Joshua Feb 22 '10 at 1:56
2  
This only works assuming sizeof(int) == sizeof(ptr) on the target platform. That's not always the case. –  Billy ONeal Feb 22 '10 at 1:57
2  
You have no guarantee that an int is large enough to hold a pointer. –  Brian Campbell Feb 22 '10 at 1:59
3  
@Dan: no, the only comparison you can think of is against zero. –  Justicle Feb 22 '10 at 2:28
1  
Although is an interesting workaround, I wasn't actually looking for a workaround; just an explanation. If I used this cast in real code it would signal a WTF (to me, at least). –  Michael Feb 22 '10 at 2:43
show 6 more comments

switch statements operate on integral expressions only. A pointer is not an integral expression.

You can explicitly convert a pointer to an integral type if you wanted to, but the proposed code is a little strange and unnatural.

So to answer your question exactly: Because there is no implicit conversion between a pointer and an integral type.

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case labels expect a constant-expression, usually an integer, and pointers tend not to compare well against these except in the case of NULL. You could cast to intptr_t, but it's still nonsensical when you only have one thing you can compare against.

switch statements exist because the compiler can often turn them into a jump table, which is a concept that works best if your case labels are consecutive integers. But in the case of a pointer casted to integral type, you gain nothing over an if / else by using switch except a more cumbersome syntax.

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You can (if you really must). Simply cast the pointer to an appropriately sized integer. For this intptr_t should be used. That is not to say I'd recommend it, but you may have your reasons.

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void we_can_switch_him(void *ptr)
{
    switch ((intptr_t)ptr) {
        case (intptr_t)NULL:
            printf("NULL!\n");
            break;
        default:
            printf("%p!\n", ptr);
            break;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    void *foo = "toast";
    we_can_switch_him(foo);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
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It can be related to how switch is implemented - it seems to expect at most an integer so it can use a certain CPU register which might not be possible with a pointer.

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A switch compares the variable with a set of compile-time constants. Other than null, I can't see any valid compile time constants that you might compare a pointer with. For example:

switch (ptr) { 
   case &var1: printf ("Pointing to var1"); break;
   case &var2: printf ("Pointing to var2"); break;
}

var1 and var2 are likely different in each run of the program, and would not be compile time constants. One possibility might be that they are addresses of memory-mapped ports that are always fixed, but otherwise I don't see how you could easily expand this from your two cases (null / not-null).

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Doh! why even use a switch statement? switch statements should only be used if you have 3 or more options to choose from if you have 2 options then use an if(){} else {} statement.

joshua this is not a legitimate use of a pointer in a switch.

If you really must use a switch statement then cast it to an _int64 or long long or some integral type guaranteed to be as big as or bigger than a pointer (depends on compiler).

Also some compilers may limit the maximum size of a switch to an int or some other arbitrary size. in this case you can't use a switch statement at all.

DC

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enum boolean
{
 FALSE=0,
 TRUE=!FALSE
}boolean;
...
void *ptr=NULL;
...
switch((!ptr))
{
 case FALSE:
  ...
  break;
 case TRUE:
  ...;
  break;
}
...

It's possible to switch on pointer.

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The ptr here is implicitly converted to a switchable type by applying the '!' operator --> That's not a switch on pointers –  icepack Oct 27 '12 at 7:21
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You only need this change in your switch: [ptr intvlue]

void why_cant_we_switch_him(void *ptr)
{
    switch ([ptr intvalue]) {
        case NULL:
            printf("NULL!\n");
            break;
        default:
            printf("%p!\n", ptr);
            break;
    }
}
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