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I need to fix the header of a text file.

Format:

Key firstRowColumn1 lastRowColumn1
1 Data
2 Data
3 Data
4 Data

Basically, the header has to have the first and last index, which is in the first column of my actual data. I have a set of files that look like this:

Key 0 0
1 Data
2 Data
3 Data
4 Data

How can I use awk to fix them to look like the following?

Key 1 4
1 Data
2 Data
3 Data
4 Data
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can for example use this:

$ awk 'NR==2 && FNR==2 {first=$1} NR>2 && FNR==1 {print "Key", first, prev; f=1; next} f{print} {prev=$1}' file file
Key 1 4
1 Data
2 Data
3 Data
4 Data

Explanation

It loops twice through the file. First time to fetch the data, then to print it.

  • NR==2 && FNR==2 {first=$1} in the first loop, get the value of the 1st field on the 2nd line. This is the "first" value.
  • NR>2 && FNR==1 {print "Key", first, prev; f=1; next} in case we are reading the file for the second time, print the header with the information gathered. Set the flag f as true, so that the lines will be printed from now on. Skip the record so that the current line is not printed.
  • f{print} in case the flag f is set, print the line. This will be done during the second read of the file.
  • {prev=$1} store the value of the first field, to be used in the next line to get the "end" value.

In case you want to update the current file, do:

awk '...' file file > new_file && mv new_file file
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Hmmm, for whatever reason, that command seems to execute, but it doesn't print anything out for me. –  csnate Apr 15 at 12:23
    
@csnate strange... Nothing at all? What if you for example use {first=$1; print first} instead of just {first=$1}. Does it print anything? –  fedorqui Apr 15 at 12:24
    
It finds the first and last index perfectly. Its just not printing the updated file. –  csnate Apr 15 at 12:27
    
@csnate it looks like f{print} is not behaving. Maybe you can replace it to {if (f==1) print}. –  fedorqui Apr 15 at 12:29
    
No change unfortunately. –  csnate Apr 15 at 12:30

Try this:

echo "Key $(sed -n '2s/^\([^ ]\+\) .*/\1/p' yourfile) $(tac yourfile | sed -n '1s/^\([^ ]\+\) .*/\1/p')" && sed -n '2,$p' yourfile
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