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How can I split these simple mathematical expressions into seperate strings?

I know that I basically want to use the regular expression: "[0-9]+|[*+-^()]" but it appears String.split() won't work because it consumes the delimiter tokens as well.

I want it to split all integers: 0-9, and all operators *+-^().

So, 578+223-5^2

Will be split into:

578  
+  
223  
-  
5  
^  
2  

What is the best approach to do that?

share|improve this question
    
Do you ever intend to support negative numbers? –  Kobi Feb 22 '10 at 5:56
    
@Kobi, I do plan to and right now I'm having trouble with the unary negative. See my "answer" below for my current solution (which doesn't handle them yet). –  Mithrax Feb 22 '10 at 6:41
    
By the way, I don't have Java here, but split("([*+^()-])") may work for you. It shouldn't remove tokens if they are inside capturing groups. –  Kobi Feb 22 '10 at 7:32
    
@Kobi: No, Java's split() never returns the delimiters, capture groups or no. –  Alan Moore Feb 22 '10 at 9:14
    
Shame. Thanks for checking, Alan. –  Kobi Feb 22 '10 at 9:24

9 Answers 9

You could use StringTokenizer(String str, String delim, boolean returnDelims), with the operators as delimiters. This way, at least get each token individually (including the delimiters). You could then determine what kind of token you're looking at.

share|improve this answer

Going at this laterally, and assuming your intention is ultimately to evaluate the String mathematically, you might be better off using the ScriptEngine

import javax.script.ScriptEngine;
import javax.script.ScriptEngineManager;
import javax.script.ScriptException;

public class Evaluator {
private ScriptEngineManager sm = new ScriptEngineManager();
private ScriptEngine sEngine = sm.getEngineByName("js");

public double stringEval(String expr)
{
Object res = "";
        try {
           res = sEngine.eval(expr);
          }
         catch(ScriptException se) {
            se.printStackTrace();
        }
        return Double.parseDouble( res.toString());
}

}

Which you can then call as follows:

Evaluator evr = new Evaluator();  
String sTest = "+1+9*(2 * 5)";  
double dd = evr.stringEval(sTest);  
System.out.println(dd); 

I went down this road when working on evaluating Strings mathematically and it's not so much the operators that will kill you in regexps but complex nested bracketed expressions. Not reinventing the wheel is a) safer b) faster and c) means less complex and nested code to maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
The shunting-yard algorithm will handle complex nested expressions and operator precedence. This is purely an exercise for me. –  Mithrax Feb 22 '10 at 6:39
    
Thanks for the practical links though! –  Mithrax Feb 22 '10 at 6:40

You can't use String.split() for that, since whatever characters match the specified pattern are removed from the output.

If you're willing to require spaces between the tokens, you can do...

"578 + 223 - 5 ^ 2 ".split(" ");

which yields...

578
+
223
-
5
^
2
share|improve this answer

This works for the sample string you posted:

String s = "578+223-5^2";
String[] tokens = s.split("(?<=\\d)(?=\\D)|(?<=\\D)(?=\\d)");

The regex is made up entirely of lookaheads and lookbehinds; it matches a position (not a character, but a "gap" between characters), that is either preceded by a digit and followed by a non-digit, or preceded by a non-digit and followed by a digit.

Be aware that regexes are not well suited to the task of parsing math expressions. In particular, regexes can't easily handle balanced delimiters like parentheses, especially if they can be nested. (Some regex flavors have extensions which make that sort of thing easier, but not Java's.)

Beyond this point, you'll want to process the string using more mundane methods like charAt() and substring() and Integer.parseInt(). Or, if this isn't a learning exercise, use an existing math expression parsing library.

EDIT: ...or eval() it as @Syzygy recommends.

share|improve this answer
    
Might as well split by \b, it does the same... Almost added it as an answer, but it can't deal with "1+(4)" , it gets +( as a token. –  Kobi Feb 22 '10 at 6:31
    
@Mithrax: split("\\b") will return an empty string as the first token if (as in your example) the first character is a digit. You would have to use split("(?!^)\\b") or test for the empty token afterward. I went with the lookarounds because I think it expresses the intent more clearly. –  Alan Moore Feb 22 '10 at 7:30

Here's a short Java program that tokenizes such strings. If you're looking for evaluation of expression I can (shamelessly) point you at this post: An Arithemetic Expressions Solver in 64 Lines

  import java.util.ArrayList;
  import java.util.List;

  public class Tokenizer {
     private String input;

     public Tokenizer(String input_) { input = input_.trim(); }

     private char peek(int i) {
        return i >= input.length() ? '\0' : input.charAt(i);
     }

     private String consume(String... arr) {
        for(String s : arr)
           if(input.startsWith(s))
              return consume(s.length());
        return null;
     }

     private String consume(int numChars) {
        String result = input.substring(0, numChars);
        input = input.substring(numChars).trim();
        return result;
     }

     private String literal() {
        for (int i = 0; true; ++i)
           if (!Character.isDigit(peek(i)))
              return consume(i);
     }

     public List<String> tokenize() {
        List<String> res = new ArrayList<String>();
        if(input.isEmpty())
           return res;

        while(true) {
           res.add(literal());
           if(input.isEmpty())
              return res;

           String s = consume("+", "-", "/", "*", "^");
           if(s == null)
              throw new RuntimeException("Syntax error " + input);
           res.add(s);
        }
     }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
        Tokenizer t = new Tokenizer("578+223-5^2");
        System.out.println(t.tokenize());
     }   
  }
share|improve this answer

You only put the delimiters in the split statement. Also, the - mean range and has to be escaped.

"578+223-5^2".split("[*+\\-^()]")
share|improve this answer

You need to escape the -. I believe the quantifiers (+ and *) lose their special meaning, as do parentheses in a character class. If it doesn't work, try escaping those as well.

share|improve this answer

Here is my tokenizer solution that allows for negative numbers (unary).

So far it has been doing everything I needed it to:

private static List<String> tokenize(String expression)
    {
        char c;
        List<String> tokens = new ArrayList<String>();
        String previousToken = null;
        int i = 0;
        while(i < expression.length())
        {
            c = expression.charAt(i);
            StringBuilder currentToken = new StringBuilder();

            if (c == ' ' || c == '\t') // Matched Whitespace - Skip Whitespace
            {
                i++;
            }
            else if (c == '-' && (previousToken == null || isOperator(previousToken)) && 
                    ((i+1) < expression.length() && Character.isDigit(expression.charAt((i+1))))) // Matched Negative Number - Add token to list
            {
                currentToken.append(expression.charAt(i));
                i++;
                while(i < expression.length() && Character.isDigit(expression.charAt(i)))
                {
                    currentToken.append(expression.charAt(i));
                    i++;
                }   
            }
            else if (Character.isDigit(c)) // Matched Number - Add to token list
            {
                while(i < expression.length() && Character.isDigit(expression.charAt(i)))
                {
                    currentToken.append(expression.charAt(i));
                    i++;
                }
            }
            else if (c == '+' || c == '*' || c == '/' || c == '^' || c == '-') // Matched Operator - Add to token list
            {
                currentToken.append(c);
                i++;
            }
            else // No Match - Invalid Token!
            {
                i++;
            }

            if (currentToken.length() > 0)
            {
                tokens.add(currentToken.toString());    
                previousToken = currentToken.toString();    
            }
        }   
        return tokens;
    }
share|improve this answer

You have to escape the "()" in Java, and the '-'

myString.split("[0-9]+|[\\*\\+\\-^\\(\\)]");

share|improve this answer
    
'*' and '+' are also both regex characters; also, you need 2 sets of '\\' -- one to escape in a string literal and one to escape in a regex expression. –  Drew Wills Feb 22 '10 at 2:47
    
@Drew Wills. Good catch, I edited the answer for that. –  Jaime Garcia Feb 22 '10 at 2:57
2  
@Drew, inside a character class only -, ^ and ] are treated differently. And - will match the literal when placed at the start or end of the class and ^ will match the literal when placed not at the start of the class. So [*+^()-] is the same as [\\*\\+\\-^\\(\\)] –  Bart Kiers Feb 22 '10 at 7:25

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