Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm really perplexed. I have a class A with a class method that returns a shared cache instance:

+ (NSCache *)itemCache {
    static NSCache *itemCache;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        itemCache = [[NSCache alloc] init];
    });
    return itemCache;
}

I also have a subclass B of class A.

Whenever I call [A itemCache] I get one instance of the cache. Whenever I call [B itemCache] I get a different instance of the cache.

Are static variables unique to the particular class the method is called on? I thought they were shared across all subclasses.

Edit Nevermind, there was something else going. The world does indeed work like I thought it did. I have an app target and a test target. Class A was being included in both targets. Class B was only in the app target.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Wain, Josh Caswell, Monolo, Mike, Rico Apr 15 '14 at 21:07

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Wain, Josh Caswell, Monolo, Mike, Rico
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
how do you know you get 2 different instances? –  vikingosegundo Apr 15 '14 at 15:00
    
Because I logged them and they have different memory addresses. –  Hilton Campbell Apr 15 '14 at 15:01
    
NSLog(@"%@ %@ %@", [A itemCache], [B itemCache], [C itemCache]); (I actually have two subclasses of A) logs "<NSCache: 0xe87a0a0> <NSCache: 0x14da7d00> <NSCache: 0x14da7d00>" –  Hilton Campbell Apr 15 '14 at 15:04
    
Please show us all your code, as I cannot reproduce it. <NSCache: 0x1002000e0> <NSCache: 0x1002000e0> <NSCache: 0x1002000e0> –  vikingosegundo Apr 15 '14 at 15:06
    
OK, figured it out. I have an app target and a test target. Class A was being included in both targets. Classes B and C were only in the app target. –  Hilton Campbell Apr 15 '14 at 15:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code produces the expected behavior:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface A : NSObject
+ (NSCache *)itemCache;
@end

@implementation A
+ (NSCache *)itemCache {
    static NSCache *itemCache;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        itemCache = [[NSCache alloc] init];
    });
    return itemCache;
}

@end

@interface B : A
@end
@implementation B
@end


@interface C : A
@end
@implementation C
@end



int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {
            NSLog(@"%@ %@ %@", [A itemCache], [B itemCache], [C itemCache]);

    }
    return 0;
}

logs:

<NSCache: 0x1002000e0> <NSCache: 0x1002000e0> <NSCache: 0x1002000e0>

your issue must be else-where.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.