Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have created a class called Login_Class and a header file for the class. From the main method i am calling a function which is in the Login_Class. My problem is , i am getting 2 errors which are not letting me to compile this simple program. Since am new to c++ , i am not familiar with the errors.

Here is my login class implementation

#include<iostream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include "Login_Class.h"
using namespace std;

 string checkUserType(string userType)
        {
           if(userType=="Admin")
            {
                return "Administrator";
            }
            if(userType=="HR")
            {
                return "HR";
            }
            if(userType=="staff")
            { 
                return "staff";
            }
        }

Here is the header file of the Login_Class

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#ifndef Login_Class_h
#define Login_Class_h
using namespace std;

class Login_Class
{
public: 

string checkUserType(string userType);
};

#endif

Here is my main method code

#include "stdafx.h"
#include"Login_Class.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


int main(){


    Login_Class log;
    string name=log.checkUserType("Admin"); //calling the function in the login_Class
    cout<<name<<endl;

         }

Here are the errors which i am getting

enter image description here

What am i doing wrong here ?

Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question
    
Please post the actual error text rather than a picture, I can't read that last one. –  OMGtechy Apr 15 '14 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you tried changing:

string checkUserType(string userType)

to

string Login_Class::checkUserType(string userType)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks it worked. –  Shehan.W Apr 15 '14 at 17:13

I think that include guards will help. In header files create follownig preprocessor block:

#ifndef _H_LOGIN_CLASS
#define _H_LOGIN_CLASS

////yourcode...




#endif 

Include guards prevents during compation from reading the same file more than one time. And also boosts compilation speed.

share|improve this answer
    
The original code already has include guards. In contrast to your suggestion, it doesn't use reserved symbol names. In C++ symbols starting with an underscore followed by an uppercase character are reserved for use by the implementation. Include guards also have very little impact on compile times. Precompiled headers and the /MP compiler switch, on the other hand, do. –  IInspectable Apr 26 '14 at 9:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.