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Let's say I have a function:

int AndTwoNum(int N, int M, int i)
{
    if ((i < 0) || (i > 31))
    {
        return  //what should I return here?
    }

    int mask = ~0 << i;
    int N_modify = N & mask;
    int M_modify = M & (~mask);

    return N_modify | M_modify;
}

This function replace the 0 to i bits of N with the 0 to i bits of M and return the value. However here we have to check whether i is within range [0, 31]. If it is not, we need to stop the function right away. However, I don't know what to return here for an unexpected i.

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2  
It depends. Should it be impossible? If so, throw an exception or something along those lines. Otherwise, return something that [0,31] can't return. –  keyser Apr 15 at 17:23
    
assert(i > 0 && i < 31); (include <assert.h>) –  xd6_ Apr 15 at 17:24
    
What about exceptions? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 15 at 17:25
    
Since it's C++ you should use exceptions if possible. Otherwise, if there's no out-of-bounds value to return, you could add a pointer parameter to return the computed value and return just an error code with the return value. –  ooga Apr 15 at 17:27
    
Since it's C++, there is also the option of writing in the function's documentation, "The behavior is undefined if..." (combined with the assert from an earlier comment). Who is going to call your function with knowingly wrong arguments? –  Cubbi Apr 15 at 17:29
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An option could be to just throw an exception in case of invalid input, e.g.

#include <stdexcept>   // For std::invalid_argument
...

int AndTwoNum(int N, int M, int i)
{
    // Check 'i' range.
    if ((i < 0) || (i > 31))
    {
        throw std::invalid_argument("'i' is out of valid range (0-31).");
    }
    ...
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This will print the error message and exit the process? –  user3352668 Apr 15 at 18:03
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If you want to return an integer on an error: there is no hardcoded rule for what to return on an error. Some functions return (-1) as this is expressive, but other return (0). Important thing is this value must be out of the domain of possible results, otherwise how would you know this is actually an error? In your case (-1) sounds reasonable as this is out of the domain of possible results.

int AndTwoNum(int N, int M, int i)
{
    if ((i < 0) || (i > 31))
    {
        return  (-1);
    }
    //...

In C++ you can also throw an exception.

#include <stdexcept>

int AndTwoNum(int N, int M, int i)
{
    if ((i < 0) || (i > 31))
    {
      throw std::invalid_argument("argument out of domain");
    }
    //...

Be sure to describe the bahavior to the the user giving correct description.

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I prefer using std::optional for cases like this:

#include <optional>

std::optional<int> AndTwoNum(int N, int M, int i)
{
    if ((i < 0) || (i > 31))
    {
        return  std::optional<int>(); // I got nothing for ya
    }

    int mask = ~0 << i;
    int N_modify = N & mask;
    int M_modify = M & (~mask);

    return std::optional<int>(N_modify | M_modify);
}

Then to use it:

auto n = AndTwoNum(...);
if (n) { // we got a value
    int i = *n; // unpack the value
} else {
    // no value
}

The bad news is, std::optional is not part of the current (C++11) standard. As far as I know, it's slated to be part of C++14. So compiler support is spotty. You can also use Boost.Optional in the interim, which is what std::optional is based on.

Another alternative is to return a std::pair<int, bool> where the bool portion is used to indicate whether or not the int has a valid value. This is, essentially, what std::optional does, but with a cleaner interface.

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