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I am trying to convert strings into Inetaddress. I am not trying to resolve hostnames, the strings are ipv4 addresses, does InetAddress.getByName(String host) work? Or do I have to manually parse it?

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

com.google.common.net.Inetaddresses.forString(String ipString) is better for this as it will not do a DNS lookup regardless of what string is passed to it.

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This is part of Guava. –  Matthew Flaschen Jun 19 '12 at 16:37
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Yes, that will work. The API is very clear on this ("The host name can either be a machine name, such as "java.sun.com", or a textual representation of its IP address."), and of course you could easily check yourself.

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Thanks, I looked up the api, and missed that line. –  TiansHUo Feb 22 '10 at 5:49
    
Whats when host is a pattern like 192.168.0.*? Will that work too? Regarding to Inet4Address doc there seems support for this. –  Paranaix Feb 24 '12 at 13:58
    
@Paranaix, no, it will throw a IllegalArgumentException with the message "invalid host wildcard specification" –  Matthew Flaschen Feb 24 '12 at 16:24
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in particular, the documentation says: If a literal IP address is supplied, only the validity of the address format is checked. which I read as: 'if you specify a (dotted quad notation) IP address, no DNS lookup is performed'. –  Andre Holzner Apr 3 '12 at 7:33
    
The OP said "I am not trying to resolve hostnames"; if the input to getByName() is not a valid numeric IP address, but is a valid resolvable DNS name, the name will be resolved. That does not seem to be what the OP wants. –  Raedwald Mar 28 '13 at 16:57
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You could try using a regular expression to filter-out non-numeric IP addresses before passing the String to getByName(). Then getByName() will not try name resolution.

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Beware: it seems that parsing an invalid address such as InetAddress.getByName("999.999.999.999") will not result in an exception as one might expect from the documentation's phrase:

the validity of the address format is checked

Empirically, I find myself getting an InetAddress instance with the local machine's raw IP address and the invalid IP address as the host name. Certainly this was not what I expected!

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