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#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;

int main () 
{
    double testscore;
    cout << " Enter your test score and i will tell you the letter grade you earned ";
    cin >> testscore;
    switch (testscore)
    {
        case (testscore < 60.0):
            cout << "your grade is F.\n";
            break;
        default:
            cout << "that score isnt valid\n.";
    }
return 0;
}
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I'm no C guy, but it looks like you're trying to compare a string (the input from the console) to an number without any sort of casting. Maybe that's implicit and I just don't know enough about C though. –  Chris Feb 22 '10 at 6:51
    
The extraction operator of cin is automatically converting the console input to the correct type. –  Josh Townzen Feb 22 '10 at 7:39
    
Or more accurately, there are multiple overloaded versions of the extraction operator >> that each work with a different variable type. The line cin >> testscore; will choose the correct version of the operator based on the type of testscore. –  Josh Townzen Feb 22 '10 at 7:47
    
@billy: you tell us what is wrong with the program. Then we tell you how to fix it. What errors are you getting? At compile-time or when running the program? –  jalf Feb 22 '10 at 13:11
    
@benjamin button: Why would you edit his question and put the missing brace in? That's part of "whats wrong with this program" and hence very relevant to the question! –  user123456 Feb 22 '10 at 14:29
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7 Answers

There's several problems:

  • You're missing a closing brace } at the end of main(). Not sure if that was intentional, or a cut-and-paste error.

  • The return is inside the switch statement, which means the non-default case will not return the function. Since the function returns an int, this will result in a compilation error.

  • You cannot switch on expressions like that. Use an if statement instead.

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Not entirely accurate. Firstly, in C++ a missing return statement in a value-returning function is undefined behavior, not a compilation error. Secondly, returning from main without an explicit return statement is explicitly allowed and defined by the language as equivalent to returning 0. –  AndreyT Feb 22 '10 at 7:58
    
@AndreyT: Not entirely accurate. A value-returning function must contain a return statement! I'm assuming VC++ isn't non-compliant in this regard: error C4716: 'foo' : must return a value –  user123456 Feb 22 '10 at 14:31
    
@STingRaySC: Well, 6.6.3/2 clearly states that "Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function". As I understand, issuing a diagnostic message during translation and terminating translation is a valid way to react to UB-producing code, so there's no reason to say that VC++ is non-compliant in this case. Comeau, on the other hand, issues a mere warning. –  AndreyT Feb 22 '10 at 14:58
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You can only use switch with integer types. Change your switch to an if.

(and you're missing the closing switch brace.)

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You haven't closed the switch statement block.

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You don't allow anyone to pass the class.

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Some syntax errors and the main point that switch in C can only be used for integer and bool stuff.

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;

int main () 
{
    double testscore;
    cout << " Enter your test score and i will tell you the letter grade you earned ";
    cin >> testscore;
    if (testscore < 60.0) {
            cout << "your grade is F.\n";
    }
    else {
      cout << "that score isnt valid\n.";
    }

    return 0;
}
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switch expects integer expression in the parenthesis which is not the case in your program. Also each case should be integer or constant character expression.

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Pun intended, I assume? –  user123456 Feb 22 '10 at 14:33
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You cannot have an expression as a case label; it must be a constant value known at compile time.

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