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Basically I'm making a music player in Java using Eclipse, and I have a JButton on the main GUI called "add song" - the user clicks this and another JFrame appears, allowing the user to click "browse" and select an mp3 file from the computer. I then store the data as a musicFile object I created, and I want to send this information back to the main function. My code for the "add song" action listener is the following:

private ActionListener song(final JButton button)
{
    return new ActionListener(){
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event)
        {
            addSongGUI addSong = new addSongGUI(); //the JFrame that opens

//once the user presses the "add song" button

            listOfSongs.add(addSong.musicFile); //the addSongGUI has a musicFile variable that I want to read and get information from

            String songName = addSong.musicFile.getSongName();
                            //... and do more stuff 


        }
    };
}

When this runs, "String songName = addSong.musicFile.getSongName();" gives me a null pointer exception, because it tries to read the musicFile from the addSongGUI right away, before the user can pick a song to set the musicFile. So, how can I wait until the user picks a song, closes the window, and then have this line of code read (what can I do to get rid of this null pointer exception)? Thanks.

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1  
the user clicks this and another JFrame appears - don't create another JFrame. An application should only have a single JFrame. For additional windows you can use a modeal JDialog. – camickr Apr 15 '14 at 19:50
    
Yep, the correct and easy solution is to use a modal JDialog or JOptionPane (same thing really), not a JFrame. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 15 '14 at 20:02

As noted, the correct and easy solution is not to display a JFrame when you want a modal dialog -- use a modal JDialog instead:

private ActionListener song(final JButton button) {
    return new ActionListener(){
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event)  {

            // AddSongDialog is a modal JDialog
            AddSongDialog addSong = new AddSongDialog(mainJFrame); 
            addSong.setVisible(true); // show it -- this pauses flow of code here
            String songName = addSong.musicFile.getSongName();
                            //... and do more stuff 
        }
    };
}

Again, addSongDialog is a modal JDialog, which is why you would need to pass in the application's main JFrame into it, since the JFrame (or parent JDialog) will be needed when calling the JDailog's super constructor in your constructor.

An alternative and far weaker solution is to use a JFrame and add a WindowListener to it, but why do that when the JDialog solution works so easily and simply?

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Got it, thanks for the help! – user3078608 Apr 16 '14 at 0:02

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