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I need to write a shell script that pick all the files (not directories) in /exp/files directory. For each file inside the directory I want to find whether the last line of file is received . The last line in the file is a trailer record. Also the third field in the last line is the number of data records count i.e 2315 (Total Number of lines in the file -2 (header,trailer) ) . In my unix shell script i want to check whether the last line is a trailer record by checking T and want to check whether the number of lines in the file is equal to (2315+2). If this is successful then i want to move the file to a different directory /exp/ready.

tail -1 test.csv 
T,Test.csv,2315,80045.96

Also in the inputfile sometimes 0 or 1 more fields of trailer record can be within double quotes

"T","Test.csv","2315","80045.96"
"T", Test.csv, 2212,"80045.96"
T,Test.csv,2315,80045.96
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Ok, problem solved. Please see my original post stackoverflow.com/questions/2309673/regarding-unix-grep-command/… and look under Update as to what I had to do to fix it and why –  SiegeX Feb 26 '10 at 5:53
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can test for the presence of the last line with the following:

tail -1 ${filename} | egrep '^T,|^"T",' >/dev/null 2>&1
rc=$?

At that point $rc will be 0 if the line started with either T, or "T",, assuming that's enough to catch the trailer record.

Once you've established that, you can extract the line count with:

lc=$(cat ${filename} | wc -l)

and you can get the expected line count with:

elc=$(tail -1 ${filename} | awk -F, '{sub(/^"/,"",$3);print 2+$3}')

and compare the two.

So, tying all that together, this would be a good start. It outputs the file itself (my test files num[1-9].tst) along with a message indicating whether the file is okay or why it is not okay.

#!/bin/bash
cd /exp/files
for fspec in *.tst ; do
    if [[ -f ${fspec} ]] ; then
        cat ${fspec} | sed 's/^/   /'
        tail -1 ${fspec} | egrep '^T,|^"T",' >/dev/null 2>&1
        rc=$?
        if [[ ${rc} -eq 0 ]] ; then
            lc=$(cat ${fspec} | wc -l)
            elc=$(tail -1 ${fspec} | awk -F, '{sub(/^"/,"",$3);print 2+$3}')
            if [[ ${lc} -eq ${elc} ]] ; then
                echo '***' File ${fspec} is done and dusted.
            else
                echo '***' File ${fspec} line count mismatch: ${lc}/${elc}.
            fi
        else
            echo '***' File ${fspec} has no valid trailer.
        fi
    else
        ls -ald ${fspec} | sed 's/^/   /'
        echo '***' File ${fspec} is not a regular file.
    fi
done

The sample run, showing the test files I used:

   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does not have a trailer
*** File num1.tst has no valid trailer.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with all quotes and correct count
   "T","Test.csv","1","80045.96"
*** File num2.tst is done and dusted.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with all quotes but bad count
   "T","Test.csv","9","80045.96"
*** File num3.tst line count mismatch: 3/11.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with all quotes except T, and correct count
   T,"Test.csv","1","80045.96"
*** File num4.tst is done and dusted.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with no quotes on T or count and correct count
   T,"Test.csv",1,"80045.96"
*** File num5.tst is done and dusted.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a traier with quotes on T only, and correct count
   "T",Test.csv,1,80045.96
*** File num6.tst is done and dusted.
   drwxr-xr-x+ 2 pax None 0 Feb 23 09:55 num7.tst
*** File num7.tst is not a regular file.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with all quotes except the bad count
   "T","Test.csv",8,"80045.96"
*** File num8.tst line count mismatch: 3/10.
   H,Test.csv,other rubbish goes here
   this file does have a trailer with no quotes and a bad count
   T,Test.csv,7,80045.96
*** File num9.tst line count mismatch: 3/9.
share|improve this answer
    
My Tail Record can be one of the below. "T", Test.csv, 2212,"80045.96" T,Test.csv,"2212",80045.96 Does this one elc=$(tail -1 ${fspec} | awk -F, '{print 2+$3}') handle if the record count 2212 appears with or without of double quotes? If not how can i modify it? –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:15
    
Good catch, @arav, I really should test my code before inflicting it on the unsuspecting public :-) The new code should fix that problem (and I've added some unit tests to hopefully give you a measure of some confidence as well). –  paxdiablo Feb 23 '10 at 2:20
    
@paxdiablo: You can make your code more efficient by getting rid of all the pipes to cat as they are not needed. Ex. cat ${fspec} | sed 's/^/ /' can be simplified to just sed 's/^/ /' "$fspec" and lc=$(cat ${fspec} | wc -l) to lc=$(wc -l < "$fspec"). Also, it is very important that you always quote your variables when dealing with strings that can contain spaces. –  SiegeX Feb 23 '10 at 4:21
    
I got into the habit long ago of starting pipelines with cat simply because it looks "cleaner" to me (every other stage of the pipeline being a pure stdin/stdout process), and habits die harder with age. I realise it's less efficient but I rarely care with shell scripts: the cost of an extra stdout-stdin connection is usually small compared to the real processing. But point taken. I also actively track down and kill those who put spaces in their filenames :-) You won't see any of those abominations on systems that I manage. –  paxdiablo Feb 23 '10 at 4:36
    
Thanks a lot. what does the below line do? ls -ald ${fspec} | sed 's/^/ /' I will try the program and let you know –  Arav Feb 23 '10 at 22:46
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If you want to move the files after they've been written and closed then you should consider using something like inotify, incron, FAM, gamin, etc.

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Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:35
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This code does all of the logic calculations via a single call to awk which makes it very efficient. It also does NOT hardcode the example value of 2315 but rather uses the value contained in the trailer line as I believe this was your intent.

Remember to remove the echo if you are satisfied with the results.

#!/bin/bash

for file in /exp/files/*; do
  if [[ -f "$file" ]]; then
    if nawk -F, '{v0=$0;v1=$1;v3=$3}END{gsub(/"/,"",v0);exit !(v1 == "T" && NR == v3+2)}' "$file"; then
      echo mv "$file" /ext/ready
    fi
  fi
done

Update

I had to add {v0=$0;v1=$1;v3=$3} because SunOS's implementation of awk does not support END{} having access to the field variables ($0, $1, $2, etc.) but instead must be saved to a user-defined variable if you want to work on them inside END{}. See the last row of the first table in This awk feature comparison link

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what is the gsub do? Is the exit in the awk will break out of the for loop? –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:20
    
the gsub() is to remove the quotations marks (if they exist). The exit() is actually apart of the awk command, not bash. So no, it doesn't break out of the for-loop but rather sets awk's return value as seen by bash -- '0' if we match, '1' if we don't. –  SiegeX Feb 23 '10 at 0:10
    
You really should check for a regular file first. Your (clever, I'll admit) trick, throwing away stderr to get rid of the errors when catting a directory, won't work too well with a pipe made with mkfifo (for example). It gets stuck reading that pipe forever. But, still, an elegant solution. –  paxdiablo Feb 23 '10 at 2:40
    
good suggestion, updated code to reflect. I kept the redirection of stderr to hide any sort of permission denied problems. If you want to see those, just remove the 2>/dev/null portion. –  SiegeX Feb 23 '10 at 3:57
    
Thanks a lot. SiegeX, "won't work too well with a pipe made with mkfifo". What does it mean? Does this Code will work for this case? –  Arav Feb 23 '10 at 22:44
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Don't have a UNIX shell handy here, but

#!/bin/bash
files=$(find /exp/files -type f)

should put all files in a BASH array; then iterating through each of them as paxdiablo suggested above should get you sorted

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:34
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destination=/exp/ready
for file in /exp/files/*.csv
do
    var=$(tail -1 "$file" | awk -F"," '{ gsub(/\042|\047/,"") }
    $1=="T" && $3 == "2315" { print "ok" }')
    if [ "$var" = "ok" ]; then
        echo mv "$file" "$destination"
    else
        echo "invalid: $file"
    fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:33
add comment
#!/bin/bash

ex findready.sh <<'HERE'
  i#!/bin/bash/

  let NUMLINES=$(wc -l $1)
  let TRAILER=$(cat $1 | tail -1 | tr -d '"' | sed 's/^\(.\).*$/\1/')

  if [[ $NUMLINES -eq 2317 && $TRAILER == "T" ]] ; then
      mv $1 /exp/ready/$1
  fi
  .
  wq
HERE

chmod a+x findready.sh

find /exp/files/ -type f -name '*.csv' -exec ./findready.sh {} ';' > /dev/null 2>&1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Feb 22 '10 at 22:33
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