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How to prevent an object, function or variable to be defined twice?

For example:

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){

  window.foo = true;

  console.log("111");

}()));

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){

  window.foo = true;

  console.log("222");

}()));

I hope it only outputs "111".

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1  
maybe not the greatest way but you can compare typeof window.foo and see if it is "undefined" –  Kai Qing Apr 16 '14 at 2:08
    
Just do a typical "if not defined then" check, no? –  Alexander Mistakidis Apr 16 '14 at 2:08
    
Why are you setting the same property to a function and then to true? That's just confusing. –  Matti Virkkunen Apr 16 '14 at 2:09

5 Answers 5

Only set the variable to the value of the second function if the variable does not yet exist.

if(typeof window.foo === 'undefined'){
    window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){
      window.foo = true;
      console.log("222");
    }()));
}
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1  
he's asking how to verify it doesn't exist –  Kai Qing Apr 16 '14 at 2:09
    
I have updated the answer to include that. Thanks Kai. –  valentine Apr 16 '14 at 2:13

Use const. (Although only Firefox and Chrome support it, all browsers won't throw an error if you use const.)

const cantchange = 123;  //can't change

About your code, add return true so that it won't log 222.

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){
    console.log("111");
    return true;          //window.foo = true will not work because the function
}()));                    // is returning false and assigning foo to be false.

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){
    console.log("222");
}()));
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I don't think I would approach it this way, but your code is setting window.foo to true in the function, but window.foo is then reset to the return value which is undefined.

You may have intended something more like this.

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){

  console.log("111");
  return true;

}()));

window.foo = (window.foo || (function(){

  console.log("222");
  return true;

}()));

http://jsfiddle.net/x2fyM/

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First of all, you should avoid globals.

However, to answer the question, you can check if a global variable exists this way:

window.foo = window.foo !== undefined ? window.foo : (function(){window.foo = true;console.log("111");})();

It is slightly faster than using typeof. Note: I used the ternary/conditional operator for the variable assignment, but you can use an if statement if that's more readable.

If you want to know if there is a variable that actually has not been defined, then you want to use window.hasOwnProperty('foo'), because it does not give a false positive when a variable is set equal to the value undefined.

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I found the answer in an opensource framework:

 var Sparky = Sparky || (function() {

    console.log("1111");

  return {};

})();

var Sparky = Sparky || (function() {

    console.log("2222");

  return {};

})();

link: http://sparkyjs.com/

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