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Say I have a Controller, then Model which subsequently calls many pm in libs to get some data out from the remote.

My understanding is: In a Apache child process,

If any 'die' in any pm called, I need to catch it at the upper calling party to handle it. If there is no catch. The 'die' exception will go straight up to the mod_perl, then this Apache child process will be killed.

Then Apache will fork a new child process to replace the dying one.

Is my understanding correct?

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I remember your recent question so you clearly are going for running apache mod_perl for your Catalyst deployment. Are you implementing the Plack::Handler method as was recommended? – Neil Lunn Apr 16 '14 at 5:17
    
Not yet. Is it relevant with the question? – Yang Apr 16 '14 at 6:42
    
Different mod_perl handlers will behave differently. But one way of generally saying this is there is work in progress catalyst to differ the handling of fatals to the underlying engine (preferably PSGI). But it is also fair to say that such handling is also up to the handler script that is implemented for mod_perl. But most options catch the fatal and log, then just keep going. – Neil Lunn Apr 16 '14 at 6:48

I picked out the following statement:

If there is no catch. The 'die' exception will go straight up to the mod_perl, then this Apache child process will be killed.

This works a bit different. First, your 'die' will be caught. If you are in a dispatch chain, the chain will continue even though you didn't catch the exception yourself. See abort_chain_on_error_fix in https://metacpan.org/pod/Catalyst#CONFIGURATION

Also, you may be interested in the middleware, that can catch errors, too: https://metacpan.org/pod/Catalyst#PSGI-MIDDLEWARE

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